If your stuck garage door coincides with weather changes, you may need to adjust the pressure on the opener. Some openers have a force-adjustment mechanism that controls the force that's applied to operate the door. It's best to leave this adjustment to a garage door pro, as too much force may result in the door failing to stop when it should, posing a danger to people and objects in the door's path. 

There are many steps to replacing torsion springs, but overall it's a simple, straightforward process. If you're inclined to attempt it, find a good online video tutorial (preferably done by a garage door pro) that walks you through the entire process, including how to buy the right size of springs. You can also buy new springs and any related parts online, along with the most important items that you need: the two solid-metal winding rods that you use to wind and unwind the torsion springs.
My garage door has been acting up. Not wanting to work sometimes. I noticed the blue light flashing on the opener when I push the remote button. Today it will not open. That is the only way in, so I can't go in the garage from inside the house. I can't pull the cord to release the belt drive. How do I open it now? I never did run wires to the manual button into the house. I have to use the opener. Only have one I can find now. It is not working. I need in there now.
10.7 Continue tapping until the cone moves out to the mark on the shaft. Continue holding the bar off the garage door and pulling back toward the center of the door. If the cone slips away from the mark, repeat this step. Keep an eye on the tape to make sure the bar doesn't slip out of the cone. If it does start to slip, rest the bar against the top of the garage door, insert a bar in the next hole and turn the cone up enough to make it possible for you to push the marked bar back into place.
If you use the correct tools and follow our instructions, you can rebuild the entire torsion spring system in just a few hours, without any side trips to the ER. We won't cover how to replace garage door extension spring systems in this story. But we'll show you garage door spring replacement on the more common torsion springs, the kind that mount on a bar above the garage door. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=share
Quite a few garage doors come with manual locks, especially older models, for added security for your house. These typically look like a knob or handle in the middle of your door with two bars running horizontally from each side. There may be a small button on the top or side of the handle that you can press to slide the bars across the doors, thus locking the garage door from the inside. It can be somewhat easy to accidentally hit that button, especially if you’re getting large objects out of the trunk of your car near the door.
My garage door torsion spring broke so I decided to replace it myself. Shipping was next day. I got the torsion spring rod at a local hardware store. Easy to install once I figure out how to lock down the rod from moving and loosening the door cable on the side. Instructions tells you how to do it. Great replacement spring and save $$$ doing it myself.
Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life. http://y2u.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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