What LCD said is more or less right. Those are the ranges you'd typically find you will have to pay, but it's important to remember that the rates vary across the country. One thing I always advice others to do is to get quotes from different contractors. It might not be the biggest job, but you'd be surprised how much difference there typically is in the quoted prices. If you check out the link I put in the resource, it'll take you to a site where you can get quotes from 4 different contractors at once. Under "Select service" you simply pick "Spring Replacement".
Install the vertical roller tracks first by wrapping the curved lip around the rollers. The top of these tracks should be approximately 8 in. below the top of the top section. Wait to install the upper tracks until this step is complete. Check the level of the top section to make sure the tops of the vertical roller tracks are level with each other. The bottom of the roller tracks should be at least 1/8 in. off the concrete floor. After leveling and mounting these tracks, install the upper roller (horizontal) tracks.

The following instructions for replacing garage door springs are for do-it-yourself homeowners and for maintenance repair men who service their smaller commercial or industrial sectional overhead doors. These directions are designed for torsion springs mounted to both sides of an anchor bracket above the middle of the garage door as pictured above. Instructions for replacing a single torsion spring, for replacing garage door extension springs, and for replacing Wayne Dalton Torquemaster springs are linked to our DIY Instructions page above. You'll also find a link for any other garage door parts you may need while repairing your door.
Install the center bearing and the right spring, then secure the cones. Slide the torsion bar to the left then add the center bearing. Slide the right spring onto the bar and press the bearing into the stationary cone. Connect both of the stationary cones to the center bracket with the nuts and bolts you removed previously. Remove the locking pliers or clamp from the center bracket.[10]

DIYers are generally steered away from working with torsion springs because installed springs are always under tension. To safely remove a torsion spring, you have to control the tension by holding the spring with a solid metal winding bar, then you loosen the spring from the rod and manually unwind the spring using two winding rods. The spring is potentially dangerous until it is fully unwound. By contrast, extension springs have little or no tension when the garage door is fully open.


Doors come with one or two torsion springs. If either spring is broken, the garage door opener may struggle to lift the weight of the door or fail to open the door at all. If a spring is broken, call a professional for service as these can be very dangerous to work with. Don’t try to open the door until a professional comes to inspect it and replace the springs. Springs can only be used for a certain number of open and close cycles, and over time they will eventually break and need replacing.

Garage Door Repair Centennial 80016


I went on Garage Door Nation website to look at the conversion chart from 1 to 2 torsion springs. For my 1 spring, size 2"/0.250ID/30.5" length, they recommended 2 of 2"/0.207ID/24" length. I got this kit from Amazon for $64 with $11 overnight shipping even though I could get free shipping through Prime over the weekend, but I couldn't wait for 3 more painful days. Installed it followed YouTube video. Worked better than my old one, a lot quieter. Check the video if you want to install one yourself. Professional installation costs hundreds of $$$: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
Sears Craftsman Garage Door Openers are America’s favorite. We have several options to choose from that will fit your individual needs. Sears garage door opener selections includes 1/2 horsepower, 3/4 horsepower, belt and chain drive as well as the Craftsman Smart Control garage door opener which allows you to control and monitor your garage door even when you are away from home.
"Mile High garage called shortly after submitting my request and set an appointment to have a repair man show up shortly after. They went over everything I needed to get done and gave me several pricing options to fix initial need and alleviate future issues. Work was done in a timely manner and customer service was great. Mile High garage called shortly after submitting my request and set an appointment to have a repair man show up shortly after. They went over everything I needed to get done and gave me several pricing options to fix initial need and alleviate future issues. Work was done in a timely manner and customer service was great. " http://m.youtube.com/embed/Z_eZc-kh40c
The national average for garage door repair cost is between $80 and $110. Some of the factors that affect your garage door repair cost are the type of springs (most often torsion or extension), the size and weight of the door, and the door material. Many garage door pros will charge a service fee to visit your house and determine the problem. Often, the service fee includes a set amount of labor. One example of this is an $80 service fee that includes the first hour of work plus testing and inspecting your garage door and garage door opener, while another pro may charge $150 for the same standard service call.   
6.13 Lower the second bar to the top of the garage door as you did the first bar. If your shaft is distorted inside the cone, you may need to tap the bar with a hammer as you unwind the spring. Maintain a firm grip on the bar; keep it firmly inserted completely into the cone; and be prepared at all times for the cone to slip, break, explode or snap loose from the shaft and jolt the bar down.

Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life. http://y2u.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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