If you use the correct tools and follow our instructions, you can rebuild the entire torsion spring system in just a few hours, without any side trips to the ER. We won't cover how to replace garage door extension spring systems in this story. But we'll show you garage door spring replacement on the more common torsion springs, the kind that mount on a bar above the garage door. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=share
Would have appreciated the technician to have explained in better detail about the quality of the first doors we received in our home. The garage doors that were installed recently were an upgrade. I would have selected the better quality of doors with the first installation if it had been explained in better detail and time of decision with the first doors. But, I really love the doors that were recently installed! Explained much better with the new doors. Time was well spent on my decision making and the technician this time was very helpful and knowledgeable. Thank You! Cathy Walsh
If your garage door is equipped with only one torsion spring, it will be much harder to get your door open. You will need to get 2-3 people to help lift the door up because the full weight can be anywhere from 150 to 300 pounds. We don’t recommend lifting the door when the spring break's due to the danger of it falling on someone. If you absolutely must get your garage door open, raw strength is what you need. When you get the door in the up position, use vise-grips or a c-clamp on the track below the bottom roller to hold the door in the up position. 

Affordable Garage Door Repair Centennial Co 80015


Your door’s torsion spring is located approximately one foot from the top section of your door when it is closed. It consists of two large coil springs, and is approximately the length of your arm. Its purpose is to balance the weight of your door so that a door weighing between 160 and 185 pounds is practically weightless to lift. As such, it makes it possible for a garage door opener to raise the door using only ten pounds of pressure.


Our garage door broke 3 days before Christmas, trapping my car inside. We contacted our home warranty, and within 24 hours, Sears called with an appointment time for the next day! I was so impressed! I thought, for sure, with the holidays, we would have to wait. When the technician showed up, he was so friendly. Unfortunately, the repair was not covered under our warranty, but he was able to help us get a good deal on a new spring and still make the repairs that day before he left. He also gave us great advice on how to keep the spring lubricated so it would not break again. I felt like he really went above and beyond to provide great service. Since moving into this new house in August, we have used Sears for several things now, and have been very pleased with the service. It's nice to see that in an age when so many companies just put customer service on the back burner in order to meet their bottom line, Sears still really cares and makes their customers feel important. Thanks for taking care of us this Christmas!

The garage door opens and closes many times throughout the year, and something may blow inside. While it is usually something such as loose leaves or small amounts of dirt, the rails that the door travel along can collect this loose debris. Over time, the buildup of debris creates a blockage on the rails. Note where on the rails the door is stuck and clean that area. If children use the garage to leave the house, it's sometimes something as simple as a small, bouncing ball that happens to land in just the right -- or wrong -- spot. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&hc_location=ufi
Weather conditions can make rails expand or contract slightly, which requires a little extra pressure from the opener to compensate. Turning the force-adjustment screw increases or decreases the force. However, adjusting the force is not something to play around with unless you are confident you know what you’re doing. The force adjustment signals the opener to stop and reverse when objects are detected in the closing path. Too little force and just about anything will trigger it to stop, but too much force and the garage door might not respond to resistance from something or someone in the path when the door is trying to close.
If you have a single-car garage, an extension spring will do the job. If you’re looking for a smoother motion and an ability to lift heavier doors, you may be better off selecting the torsion spring option. And if you have a two-car garage, your door will likely be too heavy for an extension spring. In this case, the torsion spring is the better choice.
Although garage door springs can break during any season and at any time, they most commonly break during the winter. This has to do with the temperature change. When the temperature sinks below a specific threshold, the metal will contract. This means it’s extremely possible for your door springs to shrink slightly during the winter months. This is hard on the springs and makes them more likely to break.
When cleaning the photo eye, you should take care not to scratch or damage the eye since it’s made of glass, similar to that of a camera lens. The photo eye itself is pretty small, only a few centimeters in diameter, but it can get dirty rather easily. To clean it, you’ll need a soft cloth and a mild, streak-free cleaner. Gently wipe away any dirt or residue that has built up on the eye and be careful not to oversaturate as excessive wetness can cause dirt to stick to the eye more quickly.
Slide the left spring onto the tube and add the cable drum. When your new springs arrive, put the new left spring (the 1 with the end facing up and to the left) on the torsion tube, making sure that the stationary cone on the end of the spring faces the center bracket. After sliding the new spring into place, replace the cable drum and insert the torsion bar into the left bearing bracket.[9]
Garage door springs can —and will—break, and if you're anywhere near the garage when this happens, you'll know it. Nothing else sounds quite like a giant metal spring snapping under tension. Even if you don't hear it, you'll know the spring broke as soon as you (or your garage door opener) try to lift the door and finds that it now weighs twice as much. So faced with a broken garage door spring, the question is, can you fix it yourself?

The Leading (scam) in the industry is the "LIFETIME WARRANTY". It sounds great when presented and seems fair and maybe even a good idea even though the initial cost seems pretty high (on average 450 - 700 dollars) what is not mentioned is the annual required cost (known as the required or annual door maintenance) to keep the warranty valid which if a standard 15,000 cycle spring/s is used should average Ten years, this annual service is usually 90 - 120 dollars. That would be another "900 - 1200" dollars invested in Ten years, that and the initial cost and you could buy two or more "complete new" doors in that time.
2. These springs do wear out over time – in fact, they are commonly rated with what is called a cycle life. The average standard cycle life is ten thousand cycles with each cycle being one opening and closing of the door. This means for a door that sees four cycles per day you might expect to replace your springs after somewhere close to seven years of use.
Test the door balance. A garage door should require only a few pounds of pressure to move it up and down. If springs wear out and lose their resiliency, a power garage door opener may need to work extra hard to lift the door. This can quickly wear out the motor on the opener. Replacing worn-out springs is usually a job for a professional technician.
Every homeowner can relate to how life's inconveniences are thrown at you at the worst possible times. The last thing you want to happen is have your car stuck in the garage when you need it most, especially when it's only been a couple months, weeks, or even days after your last garage door repair! That's why Precision leads by example and follows the industry's best practices in order to make the best recommendation to homeowners each time we step foot in a garage. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c
×