"Mile High garage called shortly after submitting my request and set an appointment to have a repair man show up shortly after. They went over everything I needed to get done and gave me several pricing options to fix initial need and alleviate future issues. Work was done in a timely manner and customer service was great. Mile High garage called shortly after submitting my request and set an appointment to have a repair man show up shortly after. They went over everything I needed to get done and gave me several pricing options to fix initial need and alleviate future issues. Work was done in a timely manner and customer service was great. "

Whenever a spring breaks, the door will not go up. Attempting to lift a door with a broken spring can be extremely dangerous. Attempting to replace the springs yourself is even more dangerous. You should never attempt to fix a broken spring yourself – only experienced, trained professionals should ever touch torsion springs. Also replacing a spring requires expertise to know exactly which spring to replace it with. The correct springs are determined based off the weight of the door. There are hundreds of combinations of springs but only one is correct for your door. It is important to have the correct springs to prevent an array of problems in the future. With the wrong springs, your opener will break much quicker and your door is more likely to come off tracks. It is alarming how many installers use the wrong size springs. Knowing which springs to use can only be determined by experience.
Test the garage door opener while the door is down. Push the wall button to operate the door opener. If the opener operates, the binding was setting the internal safety mechanisms off, alerting the opener not to close. Raise the door slightly and jiggle the emergency cord to lock the carriage back over the carriage base, and attempt to operate the door with the motor.
If your stuck garage door coincides with weather changes, you may need to adjust the pressure on the opener. Some openers have a force-adjustment mechanism that controls the force that's applied to operate the door. It's best to leave this adjustment to a garage door pro, as too much force may result in the door failing to stop when it should, posing a danger to people and objects in the door's path.

A garage door with aging springs puts an enormous load on a garage door opener, so another sign of failing springs is when you hear the electric door opener begin to strain as it attempts to lift the door. At this point, it is time to consider replacing the springs. Aging door springs can also break suddenly, a situation that can cause the door to slam shut violently. If you happen to be present when a spring breaks, you will hear a very loud sound like a gunshot, because the break usually occurs when the spring is fully loaded—stretched or twisted to its full tension. When one spring breaks, the door will suddenly feel very heavy when you try to open it by hand, and an automatic garage door opener may no longer be able to lift the door at all.
First, check to see if the transmitter on the wall inside your garage still opens your garage door when pressed. If it does, then the transmitter in your car likely just needs a simple battery replacement. If you have more than one car transmitter for your garage door, then your other transmitters will likely need new batteries soon as well, since they were probably installed around the same time.

Vincent was professional, informative, personable, efficient, and cleaned up his work area as he worked. I told him and now I am telling you... He my "Jordan" of garages. Give him a raise or at least a bonus. Thank you for sending him for my install. I am extremely pleased with my garage opener & with his install and information I am confident in its operation. Thank you.
Changing your garage springs isn’t typically a DIY project and usually requires a professional. But it’s good to know when it’s time to find garage door spring replacements. To test your springs, disable your garage door opener if you have one, then raise the door manually. If it doesn’t stay in place on its own, it’s time to replace your garage springs.
Automatic doors require not only the installation of a heavy door, but the motor and cables as well. Automatic doors are much more common now because of their convenience, but in a case such as the heavy wood door, they are a necessity. A strong motor is required to pull up a heavy door. However, automatic doors are not without their faults -- they quickly become a manual door when the power goes out.
Carriage: These doors mimic the look of doors found on old carriage houses in the days of horses and buggies. Because of their rustic look, they are often favored in the West and Southwest of the United States. The doors swing open like oversized French doors and hang from jambs on hinges. With their unique look, they create an area of visual interest for your home and are quite energy efficient. The downside is they require a considerable amount of clearance to work properly. Because most carriage garage doors are largely composed of wood, you may need to replace deteriorating or rotting door materials. The average cost for carriage garage door repairs is $133.
These instructions were first posted in 2005, and they were updated in August of 2008. I have been frank about the hazards of garage door repairs and about my own accidents incurred while replacing torsion springs. For what it's worth, you might be surprised to know that I, too, have benefitted from producing these instructions. I have not had any garage door accidents since we first published these on the web in 2005. And, in as much as I have helped keep other DIY-ers out of the emergency room, I consider myself somewhat of a medical practitioner.
Weather conditions can make rails expand or contract slightly, which requires a little extra pressure from the opener to compensate. Turning the force-adjustment screw increases or decreases the force. However, adjusting the force is not something to play around with unless you are confident you know what you’re doing. The force adjustment signals the opener to stop and reverse when objects are detected in the closing path. Too little force and just about anything will trigger it to stop, but too much force and the garage door might not respond to resistance from something or someone in the path when the door is trying to close.
Everyone wants to save money. Unfortunately, there are some areas you just can’t skimp on. This includes garage door springs. As much as it might be tempting to by smaller or cheaper springs, or maybe to buy one spring where two are needed, these attempts to save money will only end up costing more money in the end. When you buy the proper springs, they’ll last for years. When you cut corners to save money, the springs will wear out faster, meaning they’ll need to be replaced much sooner. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtu.be

A garage door with a broken torsion spring can fall rapidly and cause injury or death. However, the most common danger comes when your torsion springs break and you decide to undertake the repair/replace them yourself. Torsion springs can be very dangerous, and you not only need the exact tools for the job, but also need to have a good knowledge of the mechanics involved. Some of the parts involved in such a process can be life threatening, and must be handled with care and precision, which is why it is always recommended that you call in a professional, rather than trying to handle a replacement or repair by yourself. Failure to do so may leave you with injuries and/or damage to your property.
Overhead garage doors weigh hundreds of pounds, and doors that are not properly maintained or which are equipped with older automatic garage door openers can be safety time bombs. All too common are the tragic stories of garage doors injuring or even killing children or pets who found themselves underneath a closing door. Modern automatic door openers with auto-stop and auto-reverse mechanisms have greatly reduced such accidents, but mishaps can still occur if the door and door opener are not properly maintained. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
When cleaning the photo eye, you should take care not to scratch or damage the eye since it’s made of glass, similar to that of a camera lens. The photo eye itself is pretty small, only a few centimeters in diameter, but it can get dirty rather easily. To clean it, you’ll need a soft cloth and a mild, streak-free cleaner. Gently wipe away any dirt or residue that has built up on the eye and be careful not to oversaturate as excessive wetness can cause dirt to stick to the eye more quickly.
Whenever a spring breaks, the door will not go up. Attempting to lift a door with a broken spring can be extremely dangerous. Attempting to replace the springs yourself is even more dangerous. You should never attempt to fix a broken spring yourself – only experienced, trained professionals should ever touch torsion springs. Also replacing a spring requires expertise to know exactly which spring to replace it with. The correct springs are determined based off the weight of the door. There are hundreds of combinations of springs but only one is correct for your door. It is important to have the correct springs to prevent an array of problems in the future. With the wrong springs, your opener will break much quicker and your door is more likely to come off tracks. It is alarming how many installers use the wrong size springs. Knowing which springs to use can only be determined by experience.
Poor lubrication is a very common and easy to fix explanation for why you might find your garage door stuck. You should properly lubricate your garage door's track, the opener chain and the springs every few months as part of regular preventative maintenance. Be sure to use Clopay's Garage Door ProLube or sillicone based lubricants. Do not use WD-40.
I went on Garage Door Nation website to look at the conversion chart from 1 to 2 torsion springs. For my 1 spring, size 2"/0.250ID/30.5" length, they recommended 2 of 2"/0.207ID/24" length. I got this kit from Amazon for $64 with $11 overnight shipping even though I could get free shipping through Prime over the weekend, but I couldn't wait for 3 more painful days. Installed it followed YouTube video. Worked better than my old one, a lot quieter. Check the video if you want to install one yourself. Professional installation costs hundreds of $$$: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop

The winding and unwinding is done at a metal fitting, called a winding cone, attached to the outside end of the spring. You stick a winding bar into one of the four holes in the cone and use the bar as a lever to turn the cone. Once you've completed a quarter turn, insert the other bar into a different hole in the cone and let the bar lever against the closed garage door to hold the spring tension. This allows you to move the original bar to repeat the process, alternating the bars with each quarter-turn. It takes about 30 quarter-turns to fully tension a standard torsion spring. https://youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
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