Does your door stop when going up? Does your look crooked? Can you see a break in the spring that runs along the side of the tracks? You might have a broken extension spring. Extension springs are generally used on smaller doors like an 8×7 or a 9×7. Extension springs are attached to the bracket that holds the horizontal track to the ceiling. The extend as the door goes down and with one broken the door cannot work properly. Typically one spring is broken and the other is not, however, we would replace both. They have both been used the same amount and springs break based off of usage.

The Leading (scam) in the industry is the "LIFETIME WARRANTY". It sounds great when presented and seems fair and maybe even a good idea even though the initial cost seems pretty high (on average 450 - 700 dollars) what is not mentioned is the annual required cost (known as the required or annual door maintenance) to keep the warranty valid which if a standard 15,000 cycle spring/s is used should average Ten years, this annual service is usually 90 - 120 dollars. That would be another "900 - 1200" dollars invested in Ten years, that and the initial cost and you could buy two or more "complete new" doors in that time.
Delivered on time, with the products described: springs, winding bats, & plastic bushing. Quick install, but apparently I measured wrong, so these total length I bought was larger (which is good as there is less stress on the spring). However this did mean that I needed more than the generic rule of 30 1/4-turns of preload. I wound up with 38 1/4-turns per side for the door to balance when open 3' (per familyhandyman.com recommendations). Would definitely do it again.
Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires. https://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop

We want to hear from you and encourage a lively discussion among our users. Please help us keep our site clean and safe by following our posting guidelines, and avoid disclosing personal or sensitive information such as bank account or phone numbers. Any comments posted under NerdWallet's official account are not reviewed or endorsed by representatives of financial institutions affiliated with the reviewed products, unless explicitly stated otherwise.
Test the garage door opener while the door is down. Push the wall button to operate the door opener. If the opener operates, the binding was setting the internal safety mechanisms off, alerting the opener not to close. Raise the door slightly and jiggle the emergency cord to lock the carriage back over the carriage base, and attempt to operate the door with the motor.
The tricky parts of the job involve you carrying the tension of the spring. Replacing a spring requires that you first unwind the spring to relieve the tension, then wind it back up and secure it while it's under tension. Winding bars are used for all winding and unwinding actions—don't try to save a few bucks by substituting long screwdrivers or pieces of rebar for the real winding bars. Substitute tools are much more likely to slip, or they may bend or break under the load of the spring. https://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Inspect the area around your garage door to see if something is blocking the photo eye sensors. Then look at the tracks to see if there is any buildup on the inside. You’ll need to get a step ladder to look at the tracks on the top part of your garage, as it will be difficult to see from ground level. It may also not be a bad idea to proactively wipe down your garage door tracks periodically to prevent this type of buildup from occurring. Running a damp rag along each track should be enough to remove anything that’s lingering on the tracks. 

Garage Door Repair Centennial Co


When the car and other important equipment have been taken out, immediately remove the broken springs and replace it. The newly bought springs must be compatible with the door for it to function properly. Never attempt to close it without proper help and precaution and never leave it open if the supports are not stable. Always remember to call the technicians to ensure safety.
Containment cables. When old extension springs break, the springs and cables become heavy whips that damage cars and even injure people. To solve the whipping problem, manufacturers now offer containment cables that run through the center of side-mounted extension springs. If you have extension springs and don’t plan to replace your door, make sure the springs have these containment cables, or have a professional install them.

The following procedures are based on my 30 years in the garage door industry. In spite of my high mechanical aptitude, even after 18 years in the trade I lost the end of my left index finger. A few years later I had five stitches in my right thumb, and a year later five stitches in my left thumb. In 2004 emergency room staffs dug steel out of my eye and sewed up my ring finger with eight stitches. The best I can do is help you minimize the risk of injury; that's all I can do for myself. I am not so naive as to think that I have made my last trip to the emergency room. Repairing garage doors, particularly replacing torsion springs, is dangerous work, whether you are a do-it-yourself homeowner or an experienced technician.
First, make sure your transmitter isn’t stuck under something that could be pressing on the button. For example, your transmitter may have fallen under your car seat and the button is accidentally being pushed by something heavy rolling around on your floor. If that’s not the case, you may also need to check your transmitter’s frequency. It’s possible your neighbors could be running their garage doors on the same frequency as yours, and as they drive by, they’re opening their garage door along with yours.

2.4 The same is true of Older Overhead, BarCol and Raynor torsion springs that have winding cones with inconsistent hole sizes. If you insert a 1/2" X 18" bar in some of these holes you can move the opposite end of the bar over four inches. Bars in newer cones move less than 1 1/2". I've had many of the older cones spin loose from my bars, the last one generating an $1800 emergency room bill. If your cones are like any of these, or if they have more than 2" of play, leave the job of installing torsion springs to a professional garage door mechanic.


Springs are one of the primary components in all garage door systems. Torsion springs are usually mounted horizontally over the door opening. As the door closes, cables add tension to the springs and as the door opens that tension is released. The opening of the door causes the springs to unwind in conjunction with the weight coming off the door. This achieves a natural buoyancy. However, as the door moves up and down over time and the cycle count rises, the steel in the torsion springs will grow weak and will no longer be able to create energy or lift your garage door.
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says that about 30,000 injuries linked to garage doors are now reported every year in the United States. Many of these injuries have involved bruised or broken extremities. However, some have included serious shoulder, back, and head injuries leading to permanent disability or even death. What is the cause of these garage door injuries? One leading cause has been homeowners trying to repair or replace their own garage door springs.

Aaa Garage Door Repair Centennial Colorado 80015


As a first time homeowner, Home advisors is an invaluable tool! There is a steep learning curve that comes with buying a house!!!! Being able to have access to unbiased information is great! It really helps to have a basic idea of what costs are, and all the different things that go into each project. who knew that there was so much to consider when looking to replace garage doors!!!!
Squealing, screeching, or grinding noises from your garage door are usually indicative of a lack of lubricant or an accumulation of dirt or debris in the tracks. When removing debris, do not use harsh chemicals to clean the tracks. Once the track is clean, coat it with lubricant designed especially for garage doors, if possible. If you do not have access to this special type of lubricant, you can use WD-40 on the tracks and hardware. http://youtube.com/embed/Z_eZc-kh40c
×