Garage door springs support most of the weight of the door when it's opening and closing. A broken spring typically will make the door very hard to lift, rather than causing the door to stick halfway. But some spring problems can contribute to a stuck door. The springs help turn metal wheels, called pulleys, that help lift the door via vertical cables at each side of the door. A pulley can become jammed by an obstruction or possibly a misaligned or hung-up cable. Any problems with springs or pulley should be examined by a garage door professional. Springs (and pulleys) are highly tensioned and can be very dangerous to work with.

Nothing can be more frustrating than trying to open or close your garage door, but have it get stuck halfway. The most common reason this happens is due to a broken torsion spring, a part that is responsible for providing balance. It is a common problem that has many people saying “My garage door has a broken spring or is stuck, what do I do next”? If you are in this same boat, you’ll find the information below very useful.

Standard torsion springs (about $40 each) have a service life of 7,000 to 10,000 open/close cycles. However, you can buy double-life (25,000 cycles) replacement springs for about $65 per spring. If you have a two-spring setup and one spring breaks, the second spring will break soon. So replace them both at the same time. To get the right springs for your door, you'll have to provide the supplier some details. Here's how:
Whenever a spring breaks, the door will not go up. Attempting to lift a door with a broken spring can be extremely dangerous. Attempting to replace the springs yourself is even more dangerous. You should never attempt to fix a broken spring yourself – only experienced, trained professionals should ever touch torsion springs. Also replacing a spring requires expertise to know exactly which spring to replace it with. The correct springs are determined based off the weight of the door. There are hundreds of combinations of springs but only one is correct for your door. It is important to have the correct springs to prevent an array of problems in the future. With the wrong springs, your opener will break much quicker and your door is more likely to come off tracks. It is alarming how many installers use the wrong size springs. Knowing which springs to use can only be determined by experience.

With Garage Door Doctor, you can rest assured we will replace your springs correctly. We offer 2 types of springs – standard and high cycle. On a 7 foot tall door, our standard torsion springs will last 15,000 cycles and our high cycle torsion springs will last 50,000 cycles. How many years will this last you? That is based off only one thing – usage. For example, with standard torsion spring, if you use your door 4 times a day, you get just over 10 years of life. However, if you use your door 8 times a day, you would get just over 5 years of life. If you use door very little or if you are moving very soon, maybe standard springs would be best for you. If you use your door many times a day or if you don’t plan on moving for a while, high cycle springs would be best for you. Getting high cycle springs will ensure you won’t be stuck with a broken spring for many years to come. Either way, both types of torsion springs we offer work great – its just a matter of when the break again. Call Garage Door Doctor today to have your garage fixed properly! https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c
If you use the correct tools and follow our instructions, you can rebuild the entire torsion spring system in just a few hours, without any side trips to the ER. We won't cover how to replace garage door extension spring systems in this story. But we'll show you garage door spring replacement on the more common torsion springs, the kind that mount on a bar above the garage door. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=share

I PAID 700.00 DOLLORS TO GET THE 2 SPRINGE REPLACED WITH TOW DIFFERENT SPRINGS AND BOTH END BEARINGS PLUS INSTATTING THEM. tHIS IS ON A SATURDAY EVENING. aFTER ALL THAT i PAID BY CREDIT CARD THA THE INSTALL COULD SWIPE ON HIS PHONE. hE SAID AT THAT TIME I WOULD RECIEVE MY INVOICE VIA EMAIL. I didn,t think about it until another repair man came today 3/9/16 and he showed me that the bar that goes from one side to the other, had a bow in it of 3 inches just frome one side to the other. With this it will make the new bearings ware out faster. I trusted them to do the job right, But when i called to tell them that they replied that it was passed the 30 day warranty and they would do nothing more.

Action Garage Door Repair Centennial Co


The low rating on the CS is due to the fact that inwas out of town and my wife called because the garage door wouldn't open. We had repairs to the only other exit, and the CS said because it could be opened manually, it was no emergency. She was stuck in the house for over Sixteen hours. No emergency crew came out. Steve, a tech who came out the first time, fixed the door. It is not his fault CS took their sweet time to help a 45 year customer. I commend Steve. I do NOT have anything good to say about CS.
There are two types of garage door springs: torsion and extension. Torsion springs are horizontal and located near the top of the garage door. Check for a gap between these springs indicating a break. Springs on the sides of the garage door are extension springs. Inspect them to see if one or both of them have broken. If you have a broken spring, call a garage door technician to fix it for you as soon as possible. Never operate a garage door with a broken spring; it could severely damage the door and the operating system. Never attempt to replace a broken spring on your own, either. Replacing broken garage door springs is very dangerous for anyone other than a certified, professional repair technician.
Your decision on whether to try and replace a broken spring may depend on what type of springs you have. Garage door springs come in two main types: extension and torsion. Identifying which type you have is easy. If your door system has a long, skinny spring running parallel to each horizontal door track, then you have extension springs. If your door has one or more beefy springs on a metal rod parallel to, and directly above, the door opening, then you have torsion springs. Both of these springs are found on standard sectional garage doors. If you happen to have an old one-piece, swing-up door with vertical springs at both sides, you also have a variety of extension springs, sometimes called side springs.
Replacement spring procedure took me exactly 1 hours including preparation and clean-up for double aluminum garage door. Watch the DIY video on Youtube, save $$, be careful with winding the torsion springs. Rule of thumb: 7' height door garage= 7' x 4 (each 1/4 turn) + 1 = 29 turns (1/4 turn), 8' height door garage = 8' x 4 + 1 = 33 turns (1/4 turn), and so on....
We have had many concerns with our garage opener unit both safety issue and sleepless nights. At this time we are pleased that so far the unit is operating as it should.Hopefully we hope the issue of the unit opening by it self at early morning hours is solved. And if this is so, we want to Thank all involve in bring a satisfactory solution to this nightmare.

Vincent was professional, informative, personable, efficient, and cleaned up his work area as he worked. I told him and now I am telling you... He my "Jordan" of garages. Give him a raise or at least a bonus. Thank you for sending him for my install. I am extremely pleased with my garage opener & with his install and information I am confident in its operation. Thank you.
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While it would be wonderful if door springs lasted forever, the reality is that the simple act of opening and shutting the door multiple times every day isn’t easy. It’s hard on the springs, even though they’re built to do it. Most springs will last for a while, but they won’t last forever. The regular wear and tear of endlessly opening and shutting the door breaks them down and eventually, they’ll need to be replaced.
Through our garage door configurator by Clopay, you can design, visualize and purchase a new Clopay garage door. Upload a photo of your home and then browse the configurator to see which style works for you. Choose from a variety of designs, textures, colors, finishes, window options and decorative hardware. You’re able to easily and quickly see the transformation, and then make it a reality.
11.1 Many torsion spring replacement accidents occur from springs that are too strong. If the garage door stays on the floor by itself, remove the vise grip from the track. If the door is off the floor and the roller is against the vise grip, close the door with one hand and remove the vise grip with the other. If the springs are too strong, you have to restrain it from flying into the open position.
10.2 Tape your winding bars if you have not done so already, not only to assure that you are inserting the bars completely into the cones as you wind the torsion springs, but more importantly to assure that the bar does not slip out of the cone when you stretch the springs at the end. This has happened to me several times. Professionals always stretch torsion springs after winding them because the shaft floats horizontally between the flexible end bearing plates as the door operates. Although this may be as little as 1/4", the binding of the coils as the garage door closes oftentimes keeps the door from closing completely, especially when the torsion springs and bearings are dry.
Does your door stop when going up? Does your look crooked? Can you see a break in the spring that runs along the side of the tracks? You might have a broken extension spring. Extension springs are generally used on smaller doors like an 8×7 or a 9×7. Extension springs are attached to the bracket that holds the horizontal track to the ceiling. The extend as the door goes down and with one broken the door cannot work properly. Typically one spring is broken and the other is not, however, we would replace both. They have both been used the same amount and springs break based off of usage.
I have 2 full house humidifiers that have stopped functioning right. There are new filters, fan runs, tanks are full of water but they are not empting into the base. They have worked for part of the winter and now nothing seems to help...I loosened the caps thinking I had them too tight..... nothing seems to work .I have had humidifiers for 20 years and this is the first time this has happened to me. The humidifiers are only 2 years old. Any suggestions??
In order to prevent injury, garage doors automatically reverse if they come into contact with an obstacle. When the door closes halfway but then reverses for no apparent reason, this may be a sign that there is something preventing it from closing, something that you can't see. Check the tracks for stuff like dirt, rocks, bits of trash, or other debris. Give the tracks a wipe-down to dislodge anything that might be getting in the way. https://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c
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