The first thing to look for if your door is stuck is to check the sensors. Most automatic garage doors come with two sensors located on either side toward the bottom of the garage that will stop the door from closing in the event the event that a child or pet is in the way of the door. If your door gets stuck, the first thing to do is look at both sensors and make sure nothing is in the way.

A1 Garage Door Repair Centennial Co


Would have appreciated the technician to have explained in better detail about the quality of the first doors we received in our home. The garage doors that were installed recently were an upgrade. I would have selected the better quality of doors with the first installation if it had been explained in better detail and time of decision with the first doors. But, I really love the doors that were recently installed! Explained much better with the new doors. Time was well spent on my decision making and the technician this time was very helpful and knowledgeable. Thank You! Cathy Walsh

Most garage doors from the past 15-20 years have a photo eye which detects if a person or object is blocking the door from lowering all the way. The photo eye will be about 4-6 inches off of the ground for most doors, with an eye that is about the size of a pea. It shoots a laser across the length of the garage that, if interrupted, will cut off the signal used to lower and raise the door.
Usually, when a garage door spring breaks the door has already closed or come down. In some instances, however, a spring can snap while the door is closing or in motion, causing the door to fall rapidly. In these situations, the door can become a safety concern for you and your family, so you should keep your distance and call a garage door professional as soon as possible. Garage doors are very heavy and can cause injury if not handled properly. When a garage door problem occurs, call a Sears Garage Door expert to help.

Anytime Garage Door Repair Centennial 80016


Our technicians are specially trained to handle a variety of garage brands, styles, and configurations. After arriving at your home, a Sears technician will diagnose the problem and walk you through the options for fixing it. Next, the technician will make any necessary adjustments or replace broken parts to ensure the door can be operational once again. We always attempt to complete repairs the same day of service, and your satisfaction is guaranteed. Our representatives are standing by for your call and are happy discuss pricing options. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtu.be
If your photo eyes are clean and the door still isn’t closing, the next thing you’ll need to do is check the alignment of the eyes. The eyes should be pointing in exactly the same direction and at the same angle. If they’re off, they won’t register that the other one is there, and it’ll assume something is in its path, causing the door to stay in the open position. When checking the alignment, measure the height of each photo eye from the ground. Use a level to make sure they’re pointing directly across at each other at the same angle. A laser level will make this part a little easier, but if you don’t have one, a regular level will work as well.
Next, check to see if your garage door operator is the problem. Do this by pulling the emergency release cord when the door is in the down position (so the door doesn’t come crashing down in case there is a problem). Then, try to lift the door up manually. Does it open easily? If so, your opener is probably at fault. If it still doesn’t move, the problem likely lies with your tracks, springs, or rollers.
7.2 If the spring bracket is slotted, vise grip the bracket to secure the shaft in the bracket. This will keep the shaft from possibly falling out and causing injury or damaging the garage door or shaft. You can also secure the shaft with a cable tie. Remove the bushing from the cone and leave it on the shaft next to the center spring bracket. Often the bushing gets stuck in the cone and customers will call us about getting a new bushing until they discover it is still in the cone of the spring replaced earlier.
Product was received in two days and was as advertised. Installing these myself saved around $150 but it took around 2-3 hours. I would imagine everyone's experience is going to be different. These springs appear to be heavier duty than the ones they replaced. I couldn't use the same slots for tension as the old ones and it was trial and error in adjusting the length of my pull cable until the door closed as it should. I need to replace the springs on my other garage door and would think that will take less than an hour based on what I learned from the first install.
The following instructions for replacing garage door springs are for do-it-yourself homeowners and for maintenance repair men who service their smaller commercial or industrial sectional overhead doors. These directions are designed for torsion springs mounted to both sides of an anchor bracket above the middle of the garage door as pictured above. Instructions for replacing a single torsion spring, for replacing garage door extension springs, and for replacing Wayne Dalton Torquemaster springs are linked to our DIY Instructions page above. You'll also find a link for any other garage door parts you may need while repairing your door.
An extension spring counterbalance system consists of a pair of stretched springs running parallel to the horizontal tracks. The springs lift the door through a system of pulleys and counterbalance cables running from the bottom corner brackets through the pulleys. When the door is raised, the springs contract, thus lifting the door as the tension is released. Typically these springs are made of 11 gauge galvanized steel, and the lengths of these springs are based on the height of the garage door in question. Their lifting weight capacity can best be identified by the color that is painted on the ends of the springs. https://m.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
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