Most home centers don't carry all the replacement parts you'll need for garage door spring replacement, and most garage door service companies won't sell you springs. So you may have to order the parts online and wait for the shipment to arrive. Garagedoorpartsusa.com and stardoorparts.com are two online sources . First, inspect the condition of your cables and brackets. If you see any frayed strands on the cables or rust on the bottom brackets, replace them now before they fail. Bottom brackets cost about $15 per set. Premium-quality cables (listed as “7x19”) last much longer than economy cables and cost only about $4 more. So it's smart to buy the better cables for about $12 per set.
While it would be wonderful if door springs lasted forever, the reality is that the simple act of opening and shutting the door multiple times every day isn’t easy. It’s hard on the springs, even though they’re built to do it. Most springs will last for a while, but they won’t last forever. The regular wear and tear of endlessly opening and shutting the door breaks them down and eventually, they’ll need to be replaced. https://youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c?app=desktop
If you use the correct tools and follow our instructions, you can rebuild the entire torsion spring system in just a few hours, without any side trips to the ER. We won't cover how to replace garage door extension spring systems in this story. But we'll show you garage door spring replacement on the more common torsion springs, the kind that mount on a bar above the garage door.
CAUTION! Replacing garage door torsion springs is dangerous because the springs are under tension. If you do not use the right tools and follow safe procedures, you could lose hands, limbs or even your life. You could also damage property. We want your business, but not at the expense of your well being. Doing the job right is your responsibility. If you have any doubts about your ability to safely change your springs, we recommend you hire a professional to repair your garage door. Safety First! Then work.
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The nucleus of any garage door system is its opener. Easily overlooked, garage door openers are highly complex pieces of equipment, often containing dozens of intricate parts that work simultaneously with one another to consistently raise and lower your door. You'll know that you're getting the best from Sears as it's the home to America's #1 Garage Door Opener Brand, Craftsman*.

Nothing can be more frustrating than trying to open or close your garage door, but have it get stuck halfway. The most common reason this happens is due to a broken torsion spring, a part that is responsible for providing balance. It is a common problem that has many people saying “My garage door has a broken spring or is stuck, what do I do next”? If you are in this same boat, you’ll find the information below very useful.
Annual maintenance. Make an annual check of all nuts and bolts on rails and rollers to make sure they’re firmly tightened. Check the condition of all cables to make sure they’re not worn or frayed. Lubricate rollers and springs with a garage-door lubricant (see How to Fix a Noisy Garage Door for maintenance and problem-solving tips). The door should operate smoothly and be properly balanced. Check the balance by disconnecting the opener and lowering the door halfway- the door should hold its position. If it doesn’t, adjust the spring tension or replace the springs.
Mechanical garage door openers can pull or push a garage door with enough force to injure or kill people and pets if they become trapped. All modern openers are equipped with “force settings” that make the door reverse if it encounters too much resistance while closing or opening. Any garage door opener sold in the United States after 1992 requires safety eyes—sensors that prevent the door from closing if obstructed. Force settings should cause a door to stop or reverse on encountering more than approximately 20 lbs (9.07 kg) of resistance. Safety eyes should be installed a maximum of six inches above the ground. Many garage door injuries, and nearly all garage door related property damage, can be avoided by following these precautions.

On one-piece doors with side springs, you open the door to relieve the spring tension, and simply swap out the springs on the opener-arm mechanism; there are no cables or pulleys to deal with, and the springs have internal safety rods. Some doors have tensioners that maintain moderate tension when the door is open all the way, and on these you'll have to loosen the tensioner in order to remove the spring.
Start your garage door spring replacement project by getting a rough measurement of your springs (length and diameter). Then measure the width and height of your door. Make sure the quote includes the trip charge, parts and labor. Then ask for a price based on 7x19 lift cables and double-life springs. Those items will give you more years of service and should only add $65 to the price.

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A torsion spring counterbalance system consists of one or two tightly wound up springs on a steel shaft with cable drums at both ends. The entire apparatus mounts on the header wall above the garage door and has three supports: a center bearing plate with a steel or nylon bearing and two end bearing plates at both ends. The springs themselves consist of the steel wire with a stationary cone at one end and a winding cone at the other end. The stationary cone is attached to the center bearing plate. The winding cone consists of holes every 90 degrees for winding the springs and two set screws to secure the springs to the shaft. Steel counterbalance cables run from the roller brackets at the bottom corners of the door to a notch in the cable drums. When the door is raised, the springs unwind and the stored tension lifts the door by turning the shaft, thus turning the cable drums, wrapping the cables around the grooves on the cable drums. When the door is lowered, the cables unwrap from the drums and the springs are rewound to full tension.[7]
If you need to leave the door open until you can make repairs, block the door track on both sides so the door can't move, and unplug the garage door opener (if you have one). If you want to close the door, you can try closing it with the opener, making sure there's nothing in the door's path in case something goes wrong. However, this will put some strain on the opener. Alternatively, you can have a few strong helpers hold the door while you disconnect it from the opener and carefully close the door manually—again, it will be very heavy.

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Sears garage repair technicians are fast, with same-day, emergency repairs available in most areas. We can replace garage door broken springs, rollers, cables, hinges, sensors and weather seals. We can also adjust garage door tracks and springs to make sure your door operates smoothly. Having problems with your garage door opener? We can repair or replace that too. Check out our line of Craftsman Garage Door Openers. Craftsman is America’s #1 brand of garage door openers! 1
Wheel Track Obstruction – Try closing the garage door manually to see if there are obstructions on the wheel tracks. If that is not the case, examine your tracks for potential damage like dents and bends. Look at your door to see if it is hanging unevenly. If the track is damaged or the door is hanging unevenly, it is time to call a professional for repairs. Track repairs can typically cost $133 to $154. Cost for correcting the uneven hanging of doors themselves can vary greatly, but typically cost about $125.
If your garage door goes up and down in a jerky motion, you might have one broken spring on a two spring system. Some garage door openers are strong enough to lift a door with only one good spring. The “herky jerky” motion is especially common with garage doors equipped with extension springs. It might be something as simple as lubricating your garage door pulleys, hinges, and rollers. When in doubt or if something doesn’t feel right about your door, call a service company to have it serviced.
10.3 At this point you will wind the spring. Notice that the end of the spring on the winding cone points up when facing you. You will wind both springs up and counter intuitively as if you are trying to unscrew the winding cones from the ends of the springs. Begin by turning the spring up 1/4 turn until it meets resistance. This is your first quarter turn. Count "one." Next, insert the bar and raise it 90 degrees. Insert the second bar. This is "two." As you wind the spring it should grow in length the thickness of one coil for every turn. The cone should cover your mark after the first couple turns. Many garage door tradesmen mark the torsion springs with chalk or paint, but this often generates confusion.
Safe automatic door openers. All automatic openers must now have an auto-reversing mechanism and photoelectric eyes located near the floor on both sides of the door (see photo). If the door is closing and the beam between the eyes is interrupted, the door will automatically reverse. If the eyes aren’t connected, the door won’t operate. For instructions on how to install a new garage door opener, see How to Install a Garage Door Opener.

Quite a few garage doors come with manual locks, especially older models, for added security for your house. These typically look like a knob or handle in the middle of your door with two bars running horizontally from each side. There may be a small button on the top or side of the handle that you can press to slide the bars across the doors, thus locking the garage door from the inside. It can be somewhat easy to accidentally hit that button, especially if you’re getting large objects out of the trunk of your car near the door.

The following procedures are based on my 30 years in the garage door industry. In spite of my high mechanical aptitude, even after 18 years in the trade I lost the end of my left index finger. A few years later I had five stitches in my right thumb, and a year later five stitches in my left thumb. In 2004 emergency room staffs dug steel out of my eye and sewed up my ring finger with eight stitches. The best I can do is help you minimize the risk of injury; that's all I can do for myself. I am not so naive as to think that I have made my last trip to the emergency room. Repairing garage doors, particularly replacing torsion springs, is dangerous work, whether you are a do-it-yourself homeowner or an experienced technician.

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Many jobs around the house are fairly easy fixes. It’s relatively easy to clean out your fireplace, clean the leaves from the gutters or repaint a wall. It’s a different thing to replace your garage door spring. It’s careful work that is almost impossible to do correctly the first time. Garage door professionals spend a great deal of time learning how to do it properly, and even the most detailed instructions won’t make you an expert in the span of a few hours. It can be almost infuriatingly annoying at times and is simply better left to professionals.
Your decision on whether to try and replace a broken spring may depend on what type of springs you have. Garage door springs come in two main types: extension and torsion. Identifying which type you have is easy. If your door system has a long, skinny spring running parallel to each horizontal door track, then you have extension springs. If your door has one or more beefy springs on a metal rod parallel to, and directly above, the door opening, then you have torsion springs. Both of these springs are found on standard sectional garage doors. If you happen to have an old one-piece, swing-up door with vertical springs at both sides, you also have a variety of extension springs, sometimes called side springs.

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Install new or use this right-wound torsion spring Install new or use this right-wound torsion spring to replace broken sectional garage door torsion springs. All DURA-LIFT springs meet the DASMA standard rating of 10 000 plus door open and close cycles. Both the winding and stationary cones are professionally installed for safe operation. Winding rod is included with ...  More + Product Details Close http://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c
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