ryan was way more than early when he showed up. ryan gave me a straight up, not nonsensical "ah..ah..." like someone making up a story to listen to. direct and to the point, like a professional, gave me my options that i could present to the boss. the boss didn;t like the price of the new rollers. but she loves that it doesn't sound like a tank coming home from war. we were completely unprepared for this, so, it's good we got a guy like ryan.

The power to your garage is out with the door shut, and you need to get your car out or you'll have to take a bus. You'll notice a cord—usually with a red handle—dangling down from the guide track that the opener uses to open and close the door. This is the manual override. Once pulled, it allows you to open and close the door with your own power in the form a little elbow grease.

Once the springs break, quite a bit of tension is put on the door cables, and they will often break next. When these cables break, they will snap and forcibly fly out like a broken rubber band. Think about how much it hurts to be snapped by a broken rubber band, and then multiply it by a hundred to account for the size and weight of the garage door cables. https://www.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
Test the garage door opener while the door is down. Push the wall button to operate the door opener. If the opener operates, the binding was setting the internal safety mechanisms off, alerting the opener not to close. Raise the door slightly and jiggle the emergency cord to lock the carriage back over the carriage base, and attempt to operate the door with the motor.
Containment cables. When old extension springs break, the springs and cables become heavy whips that damage cars and even injure people. To solve the whipping problem, manufacturers now offer containment cables that run through the center of side-mounted extension springs. If you have extension springs and don’t plan to replace your door, make sure the springs have these containment cables, or have a professional install them.
Product was received in two days and was as advertised. Installing these myself saved around $150 but it took around 2-3 hours. I would imagine everyone's experience is going to be different. These springs appear to be heavier duty than the ones they replaced. I couldn't use the same slots for tension as the old ones and it was trial and error in adjusting the length of my pull cable until the door closed as it should. I need to replace the springs on my other garage door and would think that will take less than an hour based on what I learned from the first install. https://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
The national average for garage door repair cost is between $80 and $110. Some of the factors that affect your garage door repair cost are the type of springs (most often torsion or extension), the size and weight of the door, and the door material. Many garage door pros will charge a service fee to visit your house and determine the problem. Often, the service fee includes a set amount of labor. One example of this is an $80 service fee that includes the first hour of work plus testing and inspecting your garage door and garage door opener, while another pro may charge $150 for the same standard service call.    https://m.youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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