Once the springs break, quite a bit of tension is put on the door cables, and they will often break next. When these cables break, they will snap and forcibly fly out like a broken rubber band. Think about how much it hurts to be snapped by a broken rubber band, and then multiply it by a hundred to account for the size and weight of the garage door cables.
Torsion springs are located above the opening of your door with springs that slide onto a bar. Extension spring systems can be found alongside the opening of the door. It's important to know whether or not a garage door company provides service for your needs. Precision's professionally trained technicians are fully equipped to work on torsion and extension spring systems.

Extension springs last 15,000 cycles. Every time the door goes up and down is one cycle. On average extension springs will last 7 to 12 years. For most people, you know you need to replace your extension springs because it snaps. Sometimes, however, when extension springs get older, they can lose their tension and the spring becomes elongated. This is rare but it does still happen. Basically, the coils are fatigued and when the door is up you can see gaps where the spring is not relaxing properly. When this happens, the spring is useless. It is best to replace the springs at this point rather than overworking the opener which will cause it to last a shorter life.
5.1 With the cables still tight on the drums, mark the drums and torsion shaft at each end with a file or a marking pen. If at least one of the springs is still wound, don't touch the cable drums and don't grab the shaft. If the cable breaks, the drum could spin and the cable rip through muscle and bone. If the set screws aren't tight enough, the shaft could spin and cause injury.

If you use the correct tools and follow our instructions, you can rebuild the entire torsion spring system in just a few hours, without any side trips to the ER. We won't cover how to replace garage door extension spring systems in this story. But we'll show you garage door spring replacement on the more common torsion springs, the kind that mount on a bar above the garage door. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=share
All measurements should be in feet and inches. Step 1, measure across the existing door or desired space for the width, then up and down for the height. The rough opening of your space should be the same size as the door. Step 2, measure the sideroom, which is the space beside your door. Measure the width of the left side, and then the width of the right side. Step 3, measure the space above the door, which is called the headroom. Measure the height of the distance between the top of the door opening and the ceiling. Step 4, measure the ceiling, which is called the backroom. You’ll need to measure the distance of the garage door opening toward the back wall of your garage. You should have 6 total measurements in all once you’ve finished measuring the space. Keep in mind that having an automatic garage door opener installed might call for additional backroom or ceiling space.
As mentioned in issue #2, garage doors are designed with a reversing mechanism that prevents them from crushing objects in their path. If you find that your garage door closes part way and then goes back up, this can be triggered by objects on the ground blocking their path such as garbage cans or toys. It could also be caused by a buildup of debris on the tracks that prevents the rollers from moving forward. This could include small items like rocks, gum or mud buildup. If the door hits even a small object on the track, it will go back up to avoid crushing whatever is underneath it.
On one-piece doors with side springs, you open the door to relieve the spring tension, and simply swap out the springs on the opener-arm mechanism; there are no cables or pulleys to deal with, and the springs have internal safety rods. Some doors have tensioners that maintain moderate tension when the door is open all the way, and on these you'll have to loosen the tensioner in order to remove the spring.
Weather conditions can make rails expand or contract slightly, which requires a little extra pressure from the opener to compensate. Turning the force-adjustment screw increases or decreases the force. However, adjusting the force is not something to play around with unless you are confident you know what you’re doing. The force adjustment signals the opener to stop and reverse when objects are detected in the closing path. Too little force and just about anything will trigger it to stop, but too much force and the garage door might not respond to resistance from something or someone in the path when the door is trying to close.
Sears offers two different drive mechanisms to accommodate your home and budget. If you're looking for a smooth and quiet opener for a garage door with rooms located above the garage or attached to the garage, the belt drive is going to be the best for you. You can also choose a chain drive opener, which is perfect for garages that are unattached to the home.
I went on Garage Door Nation website to look at the conversion chart from 1 to 2 torsion springs. For my 1 spring, size 2"/0.250ID/30.5" length, they recommended 2 of 2"/0.207ID/24" length. I got this kit from Amazon for $64 with $11 overnight shipping even though I could get free shipping through Prime over the weekend, but I couldn't wait for 3 more painful days. Installed it followed YouTube video. Worked better than my old one, a lot quieter. Check the video if you want to install one yourself. Professional installation costs hundreds of $$$: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
One thing to consider - assuming you have 2 springs and an opener, unless the other spring is quite new, you should replace it at the same time, first because it will probably break fairly soon anyway and changing two is only about $50 more than changing one, and because the springs on both sides should be of equal stiffness - if not, then the door will be unevenly weight compensated and try to open cockeyed, increasing wear and risk of damaging the motor.
Standard torsion springs (about $40 each) have a service life of 7,000 to 10,000 open/close cycles. However, you can buy double-life (25,000 cycles) replacement springs for about $65 per spring. If you have a two-spring setup and one spring breaks, the second spring will break soon. So replace them both at the same time. To get the right springs for your door, you'll have to provide the supplier some details. Here's how:

Next, if you don’t find an obstruction, check the springs. If your door has torsion springs, which are horizontal at the top of the door, you can tell they are broken by checking for a gap between the two springs. If your door has extension springs, you can check by looking to see if they are hanging on the side of the door. If you have a broken spring, you’ll need to call a pro to replace it as this is a dangerous task. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c
If you have a garage door opener and you suspect a spring has broken, do not disconnect the opener from the door (by pulling the red emergency release handle) while the door is open. If you do, the door can come crashing down under its nearly full weight, with nothing to stop it. This is an extremely dangerous situation. It is never safe to leave the door open when a spring has broken because someone might try to close the door without realizing how heavy it is. Or, they might pull the emergency release handle on the opener.
Next, if you don’t find an obstruction, check the springs. If your door has torsion springs, which are horizontal at the top of the door, you can tell they are broken by checking for a gap between the two springs. If your door has extension springs, you can check by looking to see if they are hanging on the side of the door. If you have a broken spring, you’ll need to call a pro to replace it as this is a dangerous task.
That sagging garage door is getting harder and harder to open. Garage doors, especially older, wooden models, are as susceptible to the ravages of time and gravity as the rest of us. If your aging doors are a little saggy, square them up with the tension rods positioned on the back of the door. The rods are placed diagonally from top to bottom corners and can be tightened at a turnbuckle to straighten out the door--do a little at time to allow the door to adjust to the change. If your door isn't already equipped with tension rods, you can buy them at home centers.

Does your door stop when going up? Does your look crooked? Can you see a break in the spring that runs along the side of the tracks? You might have a broken extension spring. Extension springs are generally used on smaller doors like an 8×7 or a 9×7. Extension springs are attached to the bracket that holds the horizontal track to the ceiling. The extend as the door goes down and with one broken the door cannot work properly. Typically one spring is broken and the other is not, however, we would replace both. They have both been used the same amount and springs break based off of usage. 

Garage Door Repair Free Estimate Near Me Centennial 80015


If you have decided to replace your springs, if you are sure your door had the correct springs, and if you are ready to buy new ones, we recommend that you measure your spring or springs following the instructions in Step 4 below. Measuring springs can be difficult; most individuals, even garage door technicians, sometimes have difficulty measuring torsion springs. Ordering incorrect springs wastes time and money. http://youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c
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