Measure area labeled headroom (5), which is the distance between the top of the door opening (jamb header) and the ceiling (or floor joist). 10" is required for the standard extension spring or EZ-SET® Extension Spring System while 12" is required for a standard torsion spring and EZ-SET® Torsion Spring System. If you have restricted headroom, special hardware is available. Additional headroom is required for installation of an automatic garage door opener. NOTE: If garage door height extends above the opening, the headroom measurement should be adjusted proportionately.
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The most common question we get over the phone is, "Okay, so how much does it cost to replace garage door springs?" To give you an exact price quote, we would need to know the size of the door, weight, and type of garage door springs needed (torsion or extension). Since we carry over 30 different types of springs to account for all the different types of garage doors, we recommend that a professionally trained technician takes the proper measurements himself before giving you an exact price quote.

10.6 Here you will need to do three things at once. With your left hand, lift the bar just off the top of the door and pull it toward the center of the garage door. While lifting up and back, tap the top of the bar just under the winding cone with your other bar. Pulling the bar back toward the center of the door as you tap causes the spring cone to bind on the shaft and not slip back.


Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life. http://y2u.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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