The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says that about 30,000 injuries linked to garage doors are now reported every year in the United States. Many of these injuries have involved bruised or broken extremities. However, some have included serious shoulder, back, and head injuries leading to permanent disability or even death. What is the cause of these garage door injuries? One leading cause has been homeowners trying to repair or replace their own garage door springs.

Aaa Garage Door Repair Centennial Colorado 80015


10.13 Slowly pull down on the winding bar until the garage door rises 3" and the roller hits the vise grip on the track. The door will usually drop back down and raise the bar. If it doesn't, lift the end of the bar until the door closes. If the door comes up by itself when you hold the bar lightly, the springs are either over wound or they are too strong. You may need to remove 1/4 to 1/2 turns from the springs. If the door comes up on its own, you either have to many turns on the springs or you have the wrong springs. This can be very dangerous. We recommend getting professional help. Removing the winding bar could cause the garage door to knock you off the ladder.
Opening the door yourself is recommended only during an emergency, as there is an increased risk of it getting stuck again-or worse yet, crashing down on top of you. Moving a wooden door could cause damage to the opener, or the top of a steel door might bend underneath the pressure. If you must open the door long enough to drive underneath it, you may want to prop up either side with some 2×4 pieces of lumber to provide added stability. You could also secure your door to its tracks using a pair of vise grips or a couple of c-clamps.
Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires. https://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
I got these replacement cables for my beach house garage door after the originals rusted and broke. These are twice the diameter of the OEM cables, and fit the door perfectly. The larger cables give piece of mind for both supporting the door and providing safety cables for the extension springs. Came with all the necessary hardware, and the installation was easy with the doors blocked in the up position.
As the door is opened and closed over time, the steel in the springs can start to weaken as the door gradually becomes too heavy for them, rendering them less effective. The springs will eventually break, leaving the door closed. Torsion springs can also be affected by rust and cold weather. The good news is, the average garage door torsion springs will last somewhere between 5-7 years, and should last around 10,000 cycles. So, if you open and close your garage door 3-5 times a day for over 365 days in a year, you should get plenty of life out of your torsion springs.
Although garage door springs can break during any season and at any time, they most commonly break during the winter. This has to do with the temperature change. When the temperature sinks below a specific threshold, the metal will contract. This means it’s extremely possible for your door springs to shrink slightly during the winter months. This is hard on the springs and makes them more likely to break. https://youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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