With Garage Door Doctor, you can rest assured we will replace your springs correctly. We offer 2 types of springs – standard and high cycle. On a 7 foot tall door, our standard torsion springs will last 15,000 cycles and our high cycle torsion springs will last 50,000 cycles. How many years will this last you? That is based off only one thing – usage. For example, with standard torsion spring, if you use your door 4 times a day, you get just over 10 years of life. However, if you use your door 8 times a day, you would get just over 5 years of life. If you use door very little or if you are moving very soon, maybe standard springs would be best for you. If you use your door many times a day or if you don’t plan on moving for a while, high cycle springs would be best for you. Getting high cycle springs will ensure you won’t be stuck with a broken spring for many years to come. Either way, both types of torsion springs we offer work great – its just a matter of when the break again. Call Garage Door Doctor today to have your garage fixed properly!
The spring is the most common part to break. It is responsible for supporting and lifting the heavy weight of the door, making it easier to be opened manually. A broken spring is the most unwanted thing a homeowner would ever want to happen especially during weekdays when everybody is busy and needs to rush to school and work. It is not advisable to open the garage until the broken parts of the door has been replaced.
If your photo eyes are clean and the door still isn’t closing, the next thing you’ll need to do is check the alignment of the eyes. The eyes should be pointing in exactly the same direction and at the same angle. If they’re off, they won’t register that the other one is there, and it’ll assume something is in its path, causing the door to stay in the open position. When checking the alignment, measure the height of each photo eye from the ground. Use a level to make sure they’re pointing directly across at each other at the same angle. A laser level will make this part a little easier, but if you don’t have one, a regular level will work as well.
I got these replacement cables for my beach house garage door after the originals rusted and broke. These are twice the diameter of the OEM cables, and fit the door perfectly. The larger cables give piece of mind for both supporting the door and providing safety cables for the extension springs. Came with all the necessary hardware, and the installation was easy with the doors blocked in the up position.
8.10 Double-check to make sure you have the correct wind on your new torsion spring. On the left side next to the winding cone the end of the spring wire should be pointing up if it is facing you. Notice, also, that the cone is red which usually designates right wind. Customers frequently call and explain that when they get about six turns on the springs they spin on the cones. This is due to installing the springs on the wrong sides of the center bracket.
Garage door springs offset the weight of a garage door and allow the door to be opened and closed easily, either by hand or by an automatic garage door opener. The high-tension steel in the springs has a limited lifespan, and over time, the springs lose their effectiveness. Garage door springs come in levels of quality—they may be described as "10,000-use" or "20,000-use" springs, for example. This may sound like a very large number, but when you consider that a garage door might be opened four or five times a day, every day, every year, it becomes clear that there is a limited lifespan for these critical garage door parts.
Torsion-spring doors have a drum-like pulley at each end of the metal rod that runs through the springs. Each pulley has a cable attached to the bottom of the door. The springs and pulleys are fixed to the rod so they all rotate together. When the door closes, the rod turns and winds up the springs, creating tension. When the door opens, the springs release the tension and turn the rod in the opposite direction.
Another scenario is the garage door goes up very slowly when using the automatic opener. Some garage door openers have DC motors that start off slow when opening and then kick into a higher speed. If you have a broken spring, the opener might stay in the slower speed due to the heavy weight of the garage door. If this happens to you, close the garage door and pull the emergency release rope. Next, try to lift the door. If it is really heavy, then you most likely have a broken garage door spring.
6.13 Lower the second bar to the top of the garage door as you did the first bar. If your shaft is distorted inside the cone, you may need to tap the bar with a hammer as you unwind the spring. Maintain a firm grip on the bar; keep it firmly inserted completely into the cone; and be prepared at all times for the cone to slip, break, explode or snap loose from the shaft and jolt the bar down.
9.14 Slide the springs to the bracket. Double-check to make sure you have the right wound spring on the left side and the left wind spring on the right side. Turn the springs until the ends are facing you. The wire at the ends of both torsion springs here at the bracket should be pointing down. At the winding cones at the opposite ends, the spring wire points up. If not, reverse the springs. About once a month we get a phone call from a do-it-yourself customer who begins the conversation with, "I wound the garage door spring to about six turns and the spring came loose from the cone." We normally refer them back to this step and suggest they switch their springs.
The technician, Robert Helton, was very pleasant, helpful, and professional. He repaired the garage door opener expeditiously and explained why it hadn't worked properly. He also checked the chain mechanism and the door itself and showed me how to manually work the door should I need to do that in the future. I was very pleased with this repair work.
When I called to schedule the repair service, I was transferrd 5 times and spoke with 6 service reps. Each rep was very confused by my request to get my garage door repaired. One rep actually told me that Sears doesn't repair garage doors. I had to tell her that Sears installed the door. When I finally found a rep who could schedule my service, it took one week for the appointment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
6.13 Lower the second bar to the top of the garage door as you did the first bar. If your shaft is distorted inside the cone, you may need to tap the bar with a hammer as you unwind the spring. Maintain a firm grip on the bar; keep it firmly inserted completely into the cone; and be prepared at all times for the cone to slip, break, explode or snap loose from the shaft and jolt the bar down.	 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop

We look out for the safety of our customers and their families. That’s why we do not sell garage door torsion springs separately to consumers, and it’s also why we recommend putting your broken garage door in the hands of our experienced technicians. At Garage Door Medics, we are licensed, bonded, and insured. We have completed thousands of garage door installations and spring repairs, and we make sure they are done safely and with the right springs for your garage door system.

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Usually, when a garage door spring breaks the door has already closed or come down. In some instances, however, a spring can snap while the door is closing or in motion, causing the door to fall rapidly. In these situations, the door can become a safety concern for you and your family, so you should keep your distance and call a garage door professional as soon as possible. Garage doors are very heavy and can cause injury if not handled properly. When a garage door problem occurs, call a Sears Garage Door expert to help.
Torsion springs have three advantages over extension springs: They’re quieter, safer and easier to fine-tune. Torsion springs are quieter because you don’t have a spring knocking against a roller track. They’re safer because when a spring breaks, it usually stays on the bar. Finally, you can fine-tune the tension on a torsion spring so the door is perfectly balanced. Setting the tension on torsion springs has always been very dangerous, but torsion and extension spring systems with easy, do-it-yourself tensioning (Photo 7) are available. If you don’t use one of these DIY-friendly, easy tensioning systems (Clopay EZ-Set Spring and Wayne-Dalton TorqueMaster are two brands), you should hire a professional to release and set the tension on a torsion spring.

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How much should a garage door spring replacement cost? The national average is between $200 and $300 for a professional to come to your house and replace two springs. On line sources suggest a higher price of over $700 and that you will save $500 or more by replacing springs yourself. This is simply not true. To find the cost for replacing springs in your area look for a reputable company through Yelp or the Better Busienss Bureau. If clicking a site's BBB logo doesn't take you to the BBB site, we advise purchasing your springs from a different company.

When a torsion spring is wound up, it grows 2” in length. This is because the spring starts to compress and the metal has to go somewhere. After the spring is wound, the winding cone is clamped down on the torsion shaft so it can turn the drums to wind the cables as the door goes up. Since the end of the spring is “set” on the shaft, a two-inch gap is left when the spring break's. This is the most definite way of determining you have a broken garage door spring. https://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtu.be
Chris was very professional & thorough. He arrived on time & was able to answer all questions that I had. I was extremely satisfied with the quality of the work he performed. I spoke several times on the phone with Mrs. Carol who keep me informed prior to, during, and after the installation of my garage door. She was very professional, easy to talk with and resolved any misunderstanding that I had.
Homeowners have long been warned that torsion springs are extremely dangerous to work with and that replacing them must be left to a professional. But these claims are somewhat exaggerated. If you understand how they work, and you pay attention to what you're doing, you can replace them safely and surprisingly easily. Granted, they're a little spooky to work with at first (partly due to their reputation), but this is a good thing—you really don't want to forget that they're under tension. Thinking about every step — before you take it — is the key to staying safe.

Garage Door Repair Installation Centennial 80016


Torsion springs have three advantages over extension springs: They’re quieter, safer and easier to fine-tune. Torsion springs are quieter because you don’t have a spring knocking against a roller track. They’re safer because when a spring breaks, it usually stays on the bar. Finally, you can fine-tune the tension on a torsion spring so the door is perfectly balanced. Setting the tension on torsion springs has always been very dangerous, but torsion and extension spring systems with easy, do-it-yourself tensioning (Photo 7) are available. If you don’t use one of these DIY-friendly, easy tensioning systems (Clopay EZ-Set Spring and Wayne-Dalton TorqueMaster are two brands), you should hire a professional to release and set the tension on a torsion spring.

Safe automatic door openers. All automatic openers must now have an auto-reversing mechanism and photoelectric eyes located near the floor on both sides of the door (see photo). If the door is closing and the beam between the eyes is interrupted, the door will automatically reverse. If the eyes aren’t connected, the door won’t operate. For instructions on how to install a new garage door opener, see How to Install a Garage Door Opener. 

Loosen the set screws while holding each spring with a winding bar. Position a sturdy ladder to the side of the springs, rather than working directly in front of them, for safety reasons. Put on eye protection and leather gloves. Push a winding bar into the bottom hole of the winding cone on the outside of 1 spring. Use a wrench to loosen the 2 set screws. Keep a firm grip on the bar as the the spring will expand powerfully as the screws are released. Repeat on the other side.[2]
While it would be wonderful if door springs lasted forever, the reality is that the simple act of opening and shutting the door multiple times every day isn’t easy. It’s hard on the springs, even though they’re built to do it. Most springs will last for a while, but they won’t last forever. The regular wear and tear of endlessly opening and shutting the door breaks them down and eventually, they’ll need to be replaced. https://m.youtube.com/embed/Z_eZc-kh40c
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