Another scenario is the garage door goes up very slowly when using the automatic opener. Some garage door openers have DC motors that start off slow when opening and then kick into a higher speed. If you have a broken spring, the opener might stay in the slower speed due to the heavy weight of the garage door. If this happens to you, close the garage door and pull the emergency release rope. Next, try to lift the door. If it is really heavy, then you most likely have a broken garage door spring.
It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, that's exactly the kind of day when moisture and cold can conspire to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is just a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button. If the door refuses to budge on the first attempt, though, resist the urge to keep banging on the automatic opener button. This is likely to cause a more serious problem with the garage door opener—including, but not limited to, stripped gears, broken springs, and a burned-out motor on the opener.

When you know you’re in range and the door still won’t open, check to make sure the antenna is hanging down from the motor inside your garage and nothing is blocking it. Your antenna must be free from any obstruction to clearly receive the signal to open and close the door. Also inspect the antenna for any signs of damage. If it looks like there has been damage to the antenna, you’ll need to call your garage door technician to come out and replace it.


Even though most of us are likely used to seeing this small spring in place on our garage door, we don’t often think too much about it, and we simply count on it working when we need it to. Unfortunately, it doesn’t last forever and will eventually need to be replaced. It’s best to be proactive and notice when it begins to look worn down before it actually breaks. Otherwise, you may find yourself trying to open the garage door to drive to work one morning, only to find that the door won’t open because the spring is broken.

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6.1 It is time now to unwind the old spring that is not broken. A few warnings are in order. NEVER, NEVER, NEVER touch a set screw without first inserting a properly fitting bar into the winding cone! Also, do not use box or socket wrenches for the set screws. If the cone slips, the wrench could break your hand in 10 spots before unwinding completely. It's my guess that this is the number one cause of trips to the emergency room for inexperienced homeowners fixing or replacing their springs.

After removing the old batteries, make sure the plus and minus signs line up with the plus and minus signs on the inside of the transmitter. Otherwise, the new battery won’t work in the transmitter, and it could give you a false sign that something else may be wrong. Once the battery is in place, test the transmitter, and if it works, replace the transmitter door.


Nothing can be more frustrating than trying to open or close your garage door, but have it get stuck halfway. The most common reason this happens is due to a broken torsion spring, a part that is responsible for providing balance. It is a common problem that has many people saying “My garage door has a broken spring or is stuck, what do I do next”? If you are in this same boat, you’ll find the information below very useful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube_gdata&v=Z_eZc-kh40c

Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires.

10The type of garage door shown provides the necessary lift assistance with a “torque tube.” If you intend to use an opener, wait to install the tube. Otherwise, install the torque tube according to the manufacturer’s directions. Roll up the door about 4 feet to check for the alignment of the tracks, and make any adjustments. Then tighten all fasteners.

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I had two extension springs replaced, all for $135.00 (this included tax). The work took about 35 minutes and I was relieved to have this taken care of. You never realize the importance of something to you, until it is broken. Was this a good price? Seemed reasonable enough and the repairman came out the same day I called. Harris County Houston, Tx.
Poor lubrication is a very common and easy to fix explanation for why you might find your garage door stuck. You should properly lubricate your garage door's track, the opener chain and the springs every few months as part of regular preventative maintenance. Be sure to use Clopay's Garage Door ProLube or sillicone based lubricants. Do not use WD-40.

If the door opens this way, then there’s probably something wrong with the garage door opener. It’s a good idea to make sure the opener is plugged into its nearby power outlet. Also, make sure the circuit breaker for the garage door opener hasn’t flipped to the “OFF” position. If it has, then there may be an electrical issue that your garage door specialist should check out.

A torsion spring counterbalance system consists of one or two tightly wound up springs on a steel shaft with cable drums at both ends. The entire apparatus mounts on the header wall above the garage door and has three supports: a center bearing plate with a steel or nylon bearing and two end bearing plates at both ends. The springs themselves consist of the steel wire with a stationary cone at one end and a winding cone at the other end. The stationary cone is attached to the center bearing plate. The winding cone consists of holes every 90 degrees for winding the springs and two set screws to secure the springs to the shaft. Steel counterbalance cables run from the roller brackets at the bottom corners of the door to a notch in the cable drums. When the door is raised, the springs unwind and the stored tension lifts the door by turning the shaft, thus turning the cable drums, wrapping the cables around the grooves on the cable drums. When the door is lowered, the cables unwrap from the drums and the springs are rewound to full tension.[7]
10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode.
It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, that's exactly the kind of day when moisture and cold can conspire to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is just a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button. If the door refuses to budge on the first attempt, though, resist the urge to keep banging on the automatic opener button. This is likely to cause a more serious problem with the garage door opener—including, but not limited to, stripped gears, broken springs, and a burned-out motor on the opener.
Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life. http://y2u.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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