When a torsion spring is wound up, it grows 2” in length. This is because the spring starts to compress and the metal has to go somewhere. After the spring is wound, the winding cone is clamped down on the torsion shaft so it can turn the drums to wind the cables as the door goes up. Since the end of the spring is “set” on the shaft, a two-inch gap is left when the spring break's. This is the most definite way of determining you have a broken garage door spring. https://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtu.be
If you have a Wayne Dalton TorqueMaster system (pictured below), the springs will be inside a tube. The only way to determine if one is broken is to lift the garage door manually. If the door is heavy (roughly 60lbs for a double car door), you most likely have a broken spring inside the TorqueMaster tube. Another way to tell if you have a broken spring in your Wayne Dalton Torquemaster tube is if the door goes up and won't go back down. http://m.www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
The winding and unwinding is done at a metal fitting, called a winding cone, attached to the outside end of the spring. You stick a winding bar into one of the four holes in the cone and use the bar as a lever to turn the cone. Once you've completed a quarter turn, insert the other bar into a different hole in the cone and let the bar lever against the closed garage door to hold the spring tension. This allows you to move the original bar to repeat the process, alternating the bars with each quarter-turn. It takes about 30 quarter-turns to fully tension a standard torsion spring.

Align the upper roller tracks by carefully lifting the door halfway. Lock it in place with two locking pliers, and install the supporting brackets on the back of the rails using 1-1/4 in. perforated angle iron (available at home centers and hardware stores). Install 1-1/2 x 1/4 in. stop bolts, with the threads to the inside of the track, at the end of each upper track.
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The technician did a wonderful job - arrived on time and completed the job in less than 2 hours. I would have given him a 5 on everything if he had returned to add the additional piece (a piece that is fixed to the door frame for better insulation) to my door on the outside on the day he said he would come back. The piece he brought was of wrong color and he said he would be back with the right color the first day after New Year's Day to put up the piece. I hope he can come back soon.

An extension spring counterbalance system consists of a pair of stretched springs running parallel to the horizontal tracks. The springs lift the door through a system of pulleys and counterbalance cables running from the bottom corner brackets through the pulleys. When the door is raised, the springs contract, thus lifting the door as the tension is released. Typically these springs are made of 11 gauge galvanized steel, and the lengths of these springs are based on the height of the garage door in question. Their lifting weight capacity can best be identified by the color that is painted on the ends of the springs. https://m.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
There’s never a convenient time for your garage door springs to break. When this crucial component gives out, you need a repair job or replacement as soon as possible. That’s why Marvin’s Garage Doors is available 24/7 for emergency service. When that emergency arises, or you’re stuck in your garage and unable to get out to get to work, simply give us a call on our emergency line at 336-813-2601.
Gather the supplies and tools needed for changing the springs safely. In addition to the torsion springs you'll need a minimum of one or two 10" vise grips, an adjustable wrench, and two 1/2" X 18" winding bars. Most hardware stores sell 1/2" X 36" steel rods that can be cut in half. You'll also need a firm ladder and a rag for cleaning your hands. A ruler and a file may also be necessary; a socket wrench and sockets would shorten the time required. Finally, make sure your garage is lighted well.
If you have a garage door opener and you suspect a spring has broken, do not disconnect the opener from the door (by pulling the red emergency release handle) while the door is open. If you do, the door can come crashing down under its nearly full weight, with nothing to stop it. This is an extremely dangerous situation. It is never safe to leave the door open when a spring has broken because someone might try to close the door without realizing how heavy it is. Or, they might pull the emergency release handle on the opener.
I got these replacement cables for my beach house garage door after the originals rusted and broke. These are twice the diameter of the OEM cables, and fit the door perfectly. The larger cables give piece of mind for both supporting the door and providing safety cables for the extension springs. Came with all the necessary hardware, and the installation was easy with the doors blocked in the up position.
Replacing torsion springs is done with the door closed. You start by carefully unloading all of the springs (most standard-size doors have two; any broken spring will already be unloaded), using the winding bars. Then, you unbolt the springs from the central rod bracket, disconnect the cables from the pulleys, and loosen the pulleys and slide them off of the rod. Next, you swap out the springs, reinstall the pulleys and cables, and secure the inside ends of the springs to the central bracket. Finally, you wind up both springs (securing them with two setscrew bolts on the winding cones) and test the door for proper spring tension. Often, springs need an extra quarter-turn or two to get the door balance just right. 

Anytime Garage Door Repair Centennial Co 80016


These instructions were first posted in 2005, and they were updated in August of 2008. I have been frank about the hazards of garage door repairs and about my own accidents incurred while replacing torsion springs. For what it's worth, you might be surprised to know that I, too, have benefitted from producing these instructions. I have not had any garage door accidents since we first published these on the web in 2005. And, in as much as I have helped keep other DIY-ers out of the emergency room, I consider myself somewhat of a medical practitioner.

Thanks for asking for our input. I have enjoyed the 'Future House' episodes that you folks have created. And, I think that the amount of segments-per-season seems just about right - any more and it might begin to take the shows into an area that moves away from their core meaning (i.e. - home repair/rehab/construction, etc). Though, it's easy to understand how new and upcoming technologies fit well into TOH/ATOH's overall picture. Also, Ross Trethewey is a good sement host - very knoledgable and enthusiastic - and, as well, he gives the TOH/ATOH audience some 'younger blood' to continue forward with the show's traditions. My thoughts are to stick with 'Future House' segments.And, thanks for all of the good work you folks do in continuing to present to us each year such wonderful productions as TOH and ATOH, which we get to enjoy and benefit so greatly from!

Garage door springs can —and will—break, and if you're anywhere near the garage when this happens, you'll know it. Nothing else sounds quite like a giant metal spring snapping under tension. Even if you don't hear it, you'll know the spring broke as soon as you (or your garage door opener) try to lift the door and finds that it now weighs twice as much. So faced with a broken garage door spring, the question is, can you fix it yourself?

Not only was the upward-lifting garage door and the electric garage door opener invented by Overhead Door Corporation’s founder C.G Johnson in the 1920s, but we also have a tradition in excellence for garage door repair, service and maintenance. Even with the most reliable products problems can arise and when they do it’s important to know who to contact to fix these issues while providing solutions to prevent future complications.

On average, to have your springs replaced on your garage door will vary anywhere from $200 to as much as $400 if you were to hire a professional.  Breaking the costs down, the springs, depending on the part needed and the size, will cost about $20 to $60 each.  Add in the labor, which can be $45 to $85 per hour, depending on your location, can bring the grand total to the estimate noted.   A tilt-up door, on average, will be about 20 to 30 percent less than a roll-up door.
10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=kp
Replacing a garage door panel can add significantly to the cost of a garage door repair. Panels run horizontally on sectional roll-up garage doors. They may be made of wood, vinyl, aluminum, fiberglass or steel. Garage door panels can become damaged from hail and other extreme weather, dents and dings, car accidents, and age. When deciding if you want to replace a garage door panel, it’s helpful to compare the potential repair cost to the cost of a new garage door. Panel replacement requires a pro with the proper tools as well as the new parts. With parts and labor you could be paying more than $500 for one new panel. In comparison, a new garage door may cost $800-$1,200 (on average) with installation. If there is a possibility your garage door was structurally compromised when the panel was damaged, have the pro assess whether it’s better to completely remove and replace the door, rails and framework to ensure your home’s safety. It may also be better to completely replace your door if it is severely rusted or dented; if the paint is peeling and fading; if the door model is outdated or you can’t find replacement panels; or if the panels or rails are structurally compromised.
If your garage door's spring breaks, stops working properly, or snaps, you'll lose the ability to open and close your garage door. This could happen due to a variety of issues, like normal wear and tear or from extreme temperature changes in a short amount of time. Spring replacements require a quick response from a garage door provider near you. Contact The Home Depot and a local, background-checked technician will respond within 24 hours.
Through our garage door configurator by Clopay, you can design, visualize and purchase a new Clopay garage door. Upload a photo of your home and then browse the configurator to see which style works for you. Choose from a variety of designs, textures, colors, finishes, window options and decorative hardware. You’re able to easily and quickly see the transformation, and then make it a reality.

Eric Jonas has been writing in small-business advertising and local community newsletters since 1998. Prior to his writing career, he became a licensed level II gas technician and continues to work in the field, also authoring educational newsletters for others in the business. Jonas is currently a graduate student with a Bachelor of Arts in English and rhetoric from McMaster University. https://youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c
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