As mentioned in issue #2, garage doors are designed with a reversing mechanism that prevents them from crushing objects in their path. If you find that your garage door closes part way and then goes back up, this can be triggered by objects on the ground blocking their path such as garbage cans or toys. It could also be caused by a buildup of debris on the tracks that prevents the rollers from moving forward. This could include small items like rocks, gum or mud buildup. If the door hits even a small object on the track, it will go back up to avoid crushing whatever is underneath it.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says that about 30,000 injuries linked to garage doors are now reported every year in the United States. Many of these injuries have involved bruised or broken extremities. However, some have included serious shoulder, back, and head injuries leading to permanent disability or even death. What is the cause of these garage door injuries? One leading cause has been homeowners trying to repair or replace their own garage door springs.
Since most yards entertain play activity including baseballs and other sporting equipment, it's no surprise that garage doors experience broken glass from time to time. Regardless of the cause, it's important to repair glass quickly, since broken glass in a garage is a safety issue, a security problem, and an invitation to every bird and insect in the neighborhood to take up residence in your garage. Fortunately, it's not difficult to replace a pane of glass. The techniques are exactly the same as for replacing glazing in a house window.
"Mile High garage called shortly after submitting my request and set an appointment to have a repair man show up shortly after. They went over everything I needed to get done and gave me several pricing options to fix initial need and alleviate future issues. Work was done in a timely manner and customer service was great. Mile High garage called shortly after submitting my request and set an appointment to have a repair man show up shortly after. They went over everything I needed to get done and gave me several pricing options to fix initial need and alleviate future issues. Work was done in a timely manner and customer service was great. "

Replacing a garage door panel can add significantly to the cost of a garage door repair. Panels run horizontally on sectional roll-up garage doors. They may be made of wood, vinyl, aluminum, fiberglass or steel. Garage door panels can become damaged from hail and other extreme weather, dents and dings, car accidents, and age. When deciding if you want to replace a garage door panel, it’s helpful to compare the potential repair cost to the cost of a new garage door. Panel replacement requires a pro with the proper tools as well as the new parts. With parts and labor you could be paying more than $500 for one new panel. In comparison, a new garage door may cost $800-$1,200 (on average) with installation. If there is a possibility your garage door was structurally compromised when the panel was damaged, have the pro assess whether it’s better to completely remove and replace the door, rails and framework to ensure your home’s safety. It may also be better to completely replace your door if it is severely rusted or dented; if the paint is peeling and fading; if the door model is outdated or you can’t find replacement panels; or if the panels or rails are structurally compromised.


The tricky parts of the job involve you carrying the tension of the spring. Replacing a spring requires that you first unwind the spring to relieve the tension, then wind it back up and secure it while it's under tension. Winding bars are used for all winding and unwinding actions—don't try to save a few bucks by substituting long screwdrivers or pieces of rebar for the real winding bars. Substitute tools are much more likely to slip, or they may bend or break under the load of the spring. https://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Measure area labeled headroom (5), which is the distance between the top of the door opening (jamb header) and the ceiling (or floor joist). 10" is required for the standard extension spring or EZ-SET® Extension Spring System while 12" is required for a standard torsion spring and EZ-SET® Torsion Spring System. If you have restricted headroom, special hardware is available. Additional headroom is required for installation of an automatic garage door opener. NOTE: If garage door height extends above the opening, the headroom measurement should be adjusted proportionately.
2.4 The same is true of Older Overhead, BarCol and Raynor torsion springs that have winding cones with inconsistent hole sizes. If you insert a 1/2" X 18" bar in some of these holes you can move the opposite end of the bar over four inches. Bars in newer cones move less than 1 1/2". I've had many of the older cones spin loose from my bars, the last one generating an $1800 emergency room bill. If your cones are like any of these, or if they have more than 2" of play, leave the job of installing torsion springs to a professional garage door mechanic.
If you have decided to replace your springs, if you are sure your door had the correct springs, and if you are ready to buy new ones, we recommend that you measure your spring or springs following the instructions in Step 4 below. Measuring springs can be difficult; most individuals, even garage door technicians, sometimes have difficulty measuring torsion springs. Ordering incorrect springs wastes time and money.
There are many steps to replacing torsion springs, but overall it's a simple, straightforward process. If you're inclined to attempt it, find a good online video tutorial (preferably done by a garage door pro) that walks you through the entire process, including how to buy the right size of springs. You can also buy new springs and any related parts online, along with the most important items that you need: the two solid-metal winding rods that you use to wind and unwind the torsion springs.
Rolling sectional overhead garage door spring replacement should cost somewhere between $195 to $300 for a quality set springs (50000 cycle rating). This price will very if the garage door repair company charges a service call fee (trip charge). The most important thing to consider along with price is the quality of the springs and the warranty. There are any company that we use lower or mid quality springs and charge on the higher end because they include a lifetime warranty on the springs. The catch is that this warranty will only covers the spring for life and labor only for 30 days to a year. Look for a company that offers a equal parts and labor warranty. This insures that the warranty represents the rating of the springs that are being installed. For instants, you may buy a 1500 cycle rated spring set (last 3 years +or-) for $200 with a lifetime warranty and 1 year on labor. When a spring brakes after 3 year the spring its self is covered but the labor cost to replace the warranty spring can be between $65 to $100. This can add up over the year as the warranty will not restart at the time of the warranty replacement. On the offer hand, if you purchase a set of springs rated at 50000 cycles (last 10 year +or-) for $270 with a 10 year parts and labor warranty and a spring brakes in 8 years it would be replace at $0 cost. A must batter value! Always check service company review and get the details on the quality of springs a garage door repair company uses and the warranty, part and "labor".
The problem is that one of the garage doors "catches" (i.e. stops) while going up at about 2 feet off the ground ~90% of the time. When the button is pressed again, it goes all the way down. This cycle can be repeated ad nauseum, or I can give the door a gentle tug upward just before the "Sticking" point, and this will give the door enough "impetus" to make it all the way up.
Next, if you don’t find an obstruction, check the springs. If your door has torsion springs, which are horizontal at the top of the door, you can tell they are broken by checking for a gap between the two springs. If your door has extension springs, you can check by looking to see if they are hanging on the side of the door. If you have a broken spring, you’ll need to call a pro to replace it as this is a dangerous task. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Weather conditions can make rails expand or contract slightly, which requires a little extra pressure from the opener to compensate. Turning the force-adjustment screw increases or decreases the force. However, adjusting the force is not something to play around with unless you are confident you know what you’re doing. The force adjustment signals the opener to stop and reverse when objects are detected in the closing path. Too little force and just about anything will trigger it to stop, but too much force and the garage door might not respond to resistance from something or someone in the path when the door is trying to close.

Sears Craftsman Garage Door Openers are America’s favorite. We have several options to choose from that will fit your individual needs. Sears garage door opener selections includes 1/2 horsepower, 3/4 horsepower, belt and chain drive as well as the Craftsman Smart Control garage door opener which allows you to control and monitor your garage door even when you are away from home. https://m.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c
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