The winding and unwinding is done at a metal fitting, called a winding cone, attached to the outside end of the spring. You stick a winding bar into one of the four holes in the cone and use the bar as a lever to turn the cone. Once you've completed a quarter turn, insert the other bar into a different hole in the cone and let the bar lever against the closed garage door to hold the spring tension. This allows you to move the original bar to repeat the process, alternating the bars with each quarter-turn. It takes about 30 quarter-turns to fully tension a standard torsion spring.
Home Depot local Service Providers are background checked, insured, licensed and/or registered. License or registration numbers held by or on behalf of Home Depot U.S.A., Inc. are available at homedepot.com/licensenumbers or at the Special Services Desk in The Home Depot store. State specific licensing information includes: AL 51289, 1924; AK 25084; AZ ROC252435, ROC092581; AR 228160518; CA 602331; CT HIC.533772; DC 420214000109, 410517000372; FL CRC046858, CGC1514813; GA RBCO005730, GCCO005540; HI CT-22120; ID RCE-19683; IA C091302; LA 43960, 557308, 883162; MD 85434, 42144; MA 112785, CS-107774; MI 2101089942, 2102119069; MN BC147263; MS 22222-MC; MT 37730; NE 26085; NV 38686; NJ 13VH09277500; NM 86302; NC 31521; ND 29073; OR 95843; The Home Depot U.S.A., Inc. is a Registered General Contractor in Rhode Island and its Registration Number is 9480; SC GLG110120; TN 47781; UT 286936-5501; VA 2705-068841; WA HOMED088RH; WV WV036104; WI 1046796.
Fiberglass and vinyl garage doors are composite units, combining a steel core behind a fiberglass or vinyl skin. They have also polyurethane insulated base sections, or other type of foam insulation. These premium doors can match steel garage doors, and be a realistic imitation of wood (namely fiberglass units), but they may be more expensive than steel units.
2.4 The same is true of Older Overhead, BarCol and Raynor torsion springs that have winding cones with inconsistent hole sizes. If you insert a 1/2" X 18" bar in some of these holes you can move the opposite end of the bar over four inches. Bars in newer cones move less than 1 1/2". I've had many of the older cones spin loose from my bars, the last one generating an $1800 emergency room bill. If your cones are like any of these, or if they have more than 2" of play, leave the job of installing torsion springs to a professional garage door mechanic.

11.1 Many torsion spring replacement accidents occur from springs that are too strong. If the garage door stays on the floor by itself, remove the vise grip from the track. If the door is off the floor and the roller is against the vise grip, close the door with one hand and remove the vise grip with the other. If the springs are too strong, you have to restrain it from flying into the open position.


Door styles - in addition to the styles just mentioned, it is important to also consider additional features such as windows across the top of the door to provide light inside of the garage, the use of steel or wood frames to give decorative doors added security and stability, and insulation which can reduce energy costs in the attached garage by an impressive 15 to 20%; and


If you have a steel door, but want the look of a wood one, it is not necessary to change your entire garage door. Often, it may be possible to mimic the look of wood with skillful painting. Your local home improvement store may be able to provide good advice about the type of paint and brushes needed to mimic the look of wood for your particular door material.
Once the springs break, quite a bit of tension is put on the door cables, and they will often break next. When these cables break, they will snap and forcibly fly out like a broken rubber band. Think about how much it hurts to be snapped by a broken rubber band, and then multiply it by a hundred to account for the size and weight of the garage door cables.
2.3 Beware of older winding cones. These older Crawford and McKee torsion spring cones were made for 5/8" bars. Sometimes, however, the holes are too small for 5/8" bars. Whatever you do, don't use a 1/2" bar; instead, grind down a 5/8" bar to fit. I recently had a McKee spring let loose after winding because I used a 1/2" bar when my 5/8" bar wouldn't fit. Just before it let loose I was telling myself, "This is not safe." And it wasn't. The only safe way to replace these older springs is to make a winding bar for each hole of each cone.
Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires. https://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
Align the upper roller tracks by carefully lifting the door halfway. Lock it in place with two locking pliers, and install the supporting brackets on the back of the rails using 1-1/4 in. perforated angle iron (available at home centers and hardware stores). Install 1-1/2 x 1/4 in. stop bolts, with the threads to the inside of the track, at the end of each upper track.
Overhead garage doors weigh hundreds of pounds, and doors that are not properly maintained or which are equipped with older automatic garage door openers can be safety time bombs. All too common are the tragic stories of garage doors injuring or even killing children or pets who found themselves underneath a closing door. Modern automatic door openers with auto-stop and auto-reverse mechanisms have greatly reduced such accidents, but mishaps can still occur if the door and door opener are not properly maintained.
Thanks for asking for our input. I have enjoyed the 'Future House' episodes that you folks have created. And, I think that the amount of segments-per-season seems just about right - any more and it might begin to take the shows into an area that moves away from their core meaning (i.e. - home repair/rehab/construction, etc). Though, it's easy to understand how new and upcoming technologies fit well into TOH/ATOH's overall picture. Also, Ross Trethewey is a good sement host - very knoledgable and enthusiastic - and, as well, he gives the TOH/ATOH audience some 'younger blood' to continue forward with the show's traditions. My thoughts are to stick with 'Future House' segments.And, thanks for all of the good work you folks do in continuing to present to us each year such wonderful productions as TOH and ATOH, which we get to enjoy and benefit so greatly from!
A garage door with a broken torsion spring can fall rapidly and cause injury or death. However, the most common danger comes when your torsion springs break and you decide to undertake the repair/replace them yourself. Torsion springs can be very dangerous, and you not only need the exact tools for the job, but also need to have a good knowledge of the mechanics involved. Some of the parts involved in such a process can be life threatening, and must be handled with care and precision, which is why it is always recommended that you call in a professional, rather than trying to handle a replacement or repair by yourself. Failure to do so may leave you with injuries and/or damage to your property.
Loosen the set screws while holding each spring with a winding bar. Position a sturdy ladder to the side of the springs, rather than working directly in front of them, for safety reasons. Put on eye protection and leather gloves. Push a winding bar into the bottom hole of the winding cone on the outside of 1 spring. Use a wrench to loosen the 2 set screws. Keep a firm grip on the bar as the the spring will expand powerfully as the screws are released. Repeat on the other side.[2]
That sagging garage door is getting harder and harder to open. Garage doors, especially older, wooden models, are as susceptible to the ravages of time and gravity as the rest of us. If your aging doors are a little saggy, square them up with the tension rods positioned on the back of the door. The rods are placed diagonally from top to bottom corners and can be tightened at a turnbuckle to straighten out the door--do a little at time to allow the door to adjust to the change. If your door isn't already equipped with tension rods, you can buy them at home centers.
I'm getting a good laugh on all the comments on "Garage Door Nation" on how easy they or people make it sound to order and change out their torsion springs. First off, if you do your shopping, the savings is about $50 - $75 having a company do it. Is it worth the 3 days wait without the use of your garage door, the safety risk and your time doing it yourself? If yes, then go for it!
The history of the garage door could date back to 450 BC when chariots were stored in gatehouses, but in the U.S. it arose around the start of the 20th century. As early as 1902, American manufacturers—including Cornell Iron Works—published catalogs featuring a "float over door." Evidence of an upward-lifting garage door can be found in a catalog in 1906.[4]
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says that about 30,000 injuries linked to garage doors are now reported every year in the United States. Many of these injuries have involved bruised or broken extremities. However, some have included serious shoulder, back, and head injuries leading to permanent disability or even death. What is the cause of these garage door injuries? One leading cause has been homeowners trying to repair or replace their own garage door springs.
Quite a few garage doors come with manual locks, especially older models, for added security for your house. These typically look like a knob or handle in the middle of your door with two bars running horizontally from each side. There may be a small button on the top or side of the handle that you can press to slide the bars across the doors, thus locking the garage door from the inside. It can be somewhat easy to accidentally hit that button, especially if you’re getting large objects out of the trunk of your car near the door.
Quite a few garage doors come with manual locks, especially older models, for added security for your house. These typically look like a knob or handle in the middle of your door with two bars running horizontally from each side. There may be a small button on the top or side of the handle that you can press to slide the bars across the doors, thus locking the garage door from the inside. It can be somewhat easy to accidentally hit that button, especially if you’re getting large objects out of the trunk of your car near the door.
Torsion springs are normally mounted horizontally above the opening of your garage door. When you pull the door down, cables attached to the bottom corners actually force the springs to wind up, in turn energizing the system. When you open the door, the springs then unwind and their energy transfers to the door, helping it to lift up and making it easier to open.
We have the best team of expert professionals who know how to handle each and every type of garage door and its components. This is because all of our technicians go through a rigorous train-ing process, covering every known garage door repair technique. We do not let them onto the field until we know that they are completely trained, and can perform a job to perfection. Aside from this, they are continually updated with all the latest knowledge, information and training in order to do their work efficiently.

Opening the door yourself is recommended only during an emergency, as there is an increased risk of it getting stuck again-or worse yet, crashing down on top of you. Moving a wooden door could cause damage to the opener, or the top of a steel door might bend underneath the pressure. If you must open the door long enough to drive underneath it, you may want to prop up either side with some 2×4 pieces of lumber to provide added stability. You could also secure your door to its tracks using a pair of vise grips or a couple of c-clamps.

SNAP... bang... boom. That is the sound of a garage door torsion spring breaking. It can be a very loud noise that sounds like a firecracker or gunshot. Springs are rated for a certain number of cycles and are the first thing that will break in your garage door assembly. Broken springs are the #1 source of customer calls for garage door repair companies. If you have a broken spring, you should NEVER try to open the door, as it can be very dangerous. This repair should be left to a professional or someone with the right tools and skills. http://youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c?version=3


If you have decided to replace your springs, if you are sure your door had the correct springs, and if you are ready to buy new ones, we recommend that you measure your spring or springs following the instructions in Step 4 below. Measuring springs can be difficult; most individuals, even garage door technicians, sometimes have difficulty measuring torsion springs. Ordering incorrect springs wastes time and money.
Garage door springs support most of the weight of the door when it's opening and closing. A broken spring typically will make the door very hard to lift, rather than causing the door to stick halfway. But some spring problems can contribute to a stuck door. The springs help turn metal wheels, called pulleys, that help lift the door via vertical cables at each side of the door. A pulley can become jammed by an obstruction or possibly a misaligned or hung-up cable. Any problems with springs or pulley should be examined by a garage door professional. Springs (and pulleys) are highly tensioned and can be very dangerous to work with.

Loosen the set screws while holding each spring with a winding bar. Position a sturdy ladder to the side of the springs, rather than working directly in front of them, for safety reasons. Put on eye protection and leather gloves. Push a winding bar into the bottom hole of the winding cone on the outside of 1 spring. Use a wrench to loosen the 2 set screws. Keep a firm grip on the bar as the the spring will expand powerfully as the screws are released. Repeat on the other side.[2]


For commercial or residential doors, operators and accessories outside of the U.S. or Canada you can contact international. ​​​​​​Please be sure to include the following in your e-mail, so we can connect you with the Overhead Door™ Distributor that can best serve you: Contact Person, Phone Number (including local dialing code), Company Name, City and Country, Product(s) of interest (i.e. residential or commercial garage doors, operators and accessories), Name of Project (if any) and Project Specifications.​​​​​​​​​​​​ 

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However, if you lose power and use the disconnect switch, you’ll need to reattach it to use your garage door motor to open and close your door again. Open the door all the way and then reattach this hook. Then try opening or closing the door again with your transmitter, and you should be all set. It will be easiest to reattach this hook when your car is not in the garage, as you’ll need to place a step ladder underneath the motor to reach it.

Install the stiffening strut on top of the top section of steel doors with the section lying flat. Then install the opener bracket that replaces the center bracket between the top two sections. While you’re working on the sections, protect them from scratches by putting carpet scraps on top of your sawhorses. Now, slide the rollers into the roller brackets.

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11.2c If the springs you installed are too weak, and you wind the springs the correct number of turns, the door will be heavy at the floor, and it will not stay open half way, but it will stay open if raised completely. If tension is added to the torsion springs to lighten the garage door and to get it stay open half way, the door will be harder to close; openers often damage the new steel garage doors when they are too hard to close.
If the door only goes up six inches and stops, or moves very slowly when using your remote, you could have a broken spring as well. Some customers will notice that the top section of their door is bent or that the door falls very quickly when lowering. Your door may be “crooked” or jerky when going up and down, and both of these signs indicate your torsion spring is in poor condition and very likely to break in the near future. Any time you hear a loud “popping” noise while operating, you should inspect your torsion spring immediately for signs of damage.

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When it comes to garage doors, functionality and safety are equally important in the eyes of Sears Garage Door technicians. Our associates know the importance of garage door safety and the hazards that a faulty garage door can pose for your family. To confirm that your garage door and opener operate safely, our technicians perform a 20-point safety check during maintenance calls and repair jobs. This safety check verifies that any repair work performed has been done correctly and that there are no lingering safety problems with your door and mechanisms. If our technician discovers any safety concerns, he’ll advise you on the best way to proceed with correcting the problem.

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Guest 9232954 -- check out the other answers for this question, and the links below the answers for even more - seems from $125-400 range from different contributors (should be replaced in pairs for balanced lifting unless one spring is quite new), about $200-250 or 300 seems a common charge. The springs themselves generally run about $20-50 each depending on lead they have to carry.

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The winding and unwinding is done at a metal fitting, called a winding cone, attached to the outside end of the spring. You stick a winding bar into one of the four holes in the cone and use the bar as a lever to turn the cone. Once you've completed a quarter turn, insert the other bar into a different hole in the cone and let the bar lever against the closed garage door to hold the spring tension. This allows you to move the original bar to repeat the process, alternating the bars with each quarter-turn. It takes about 30 quarter-turns to fully tension a standard torsion spring.

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Unlike torsion springs, replacing extension springs has long been given the "green light" for DIYers, primarily because you can complete the job without having to deal with spring tension. The general process is simple and safe: open the door to relieve the spring tension (and secure it open with C-clamps in the tracks); disconnect the spring from the track bracket and the spring pulley, and disconnect the safety cable from one end; install the new spring, reinstall the pulley, and reconnect the safety cable, and you're done.

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1. Garage door springs do almost all of the work of lifting your door regardless of the door being manually or automatically operated. The spring makes it possible for anyone to lift a product that might weigh one hundred pounds on the low end and many hundreds of pounds on the high end. Not only can anyone lift it – most can do it with one hand! In other words, the garage door spring does a lot of work.
Check your garage door rollers to see if they have come off their tracks. If no damage has been done, a tech should be able to easily place them back on. If the track has become bent, however, it must be repaired and possibly (depending on the amount of damage) replaced. Don’t operate your door if it's off track or your track is bent. Your door could become seriously damaged.

Doors with extension springs have two sets of pulleys (which are sometimes called sheaves): one at the end of each spring and one at the top of the vertical door track. They also have two cables on each side. One cable attaches to the bottom of the door, runs up and over the pulley above the door and around the spring pulley and then attaches to the door track bracket. The other cables are safety cables that run through the middle of the springs and are fixed to a track bracket at both ends. These cables restrain the springs if they break under tension. All extension springs must have safety cables.


Guest 9232954 -- check out the other answers for this question, and the links below the answers for even more - seems from $125-400 range from different contributors (should be replaced in pairs for balanced lifting unless one spring is quite new), about $200-250 or 300 seems a common charge. The springs themselves generally run about $20-50 each depending on lead they have to carry.
The technician did a wonderful job - arrived on time and completed the job in less than 2 hours. I would have given him a 5 on everything if he had returned to add the additional piece (a piece that is fixed to the door frame for better insulation) to my door on the outside on the day he said he would come back. The piece he brought was of wrong color and he said he would be back with the right color the first day after New Year's Day to put up the piece. I hope he can come back soon.

A torsion spring counterbalance system consists of one or two tightly wound up springs on a steel shaft with cable drums at both ends. The entire apparatus mounts on the header wall above the garage door and has three supports: a center bearing plate with a steel or nylon bearing and two end bearing plates at both ends. The springs themselves consist of the steel wire with a stationary cone at one end and a winding cone at the other end. The stationary cone is attached to the center bearing plate. The winding cone consists of holes every 90 degrees for winding the springs and two set screws to secure the springs to the shaft. Steel counterbalance cables run from the roller brackets at the bottom corners of the door to a notch in the cable drums. When the door is raised, the springs unwind and the stored tension lifts the door by turning the shaft, thus turning the cable drums, wrapping the cables around the grooves on the cable drums. When the door is lowered, the cables unwrap from the drums and the springs are rewound to full tension.[7]
10.7 Continue tapping until the cone moves out to the mark on the shaft. Continue holding the bar off the garage door and pulling back toward the center of the door. If the cone slips away from the mark, repeat this step. Keep an eye on the tape to make sure the bar doesn't slip out of the cone. If it does start to slip, rest the bar against the top of the garage door, insert a bar in the next hole and turn the cone up enough to make it possible for you to push the marked bar back into place.
If you have a steel door, but want the look of a wood one, it is not necessary to change your entire garage door. Often, it may be possible to mimic the look of wood with skillful painting. Your local home improvement store may be able to provide good advice about the type of paint and brushes needed to mimic the look of wood for your particular door material.
A1 Garage Door Service is known for providing only the best value for money. We always aim for the best possible customer service and experience, reasonable costs for our products and services, give FREE estimates and FREE professional advice as well as amazing deals and discounts when you book our service. What’s more, we GUARANTEE that we service all manufacturer warranties, including lifetime warranties. What more can you ask for? https://youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c?version=3
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