Overhead garage doors weigh hundreds of pounds, and doors that are not properly maintained or which are equipped with older automatic garage door openers can be safety time bombs. All too common are the tragic stories of garage doors injuring or even killing children or pets who found themselves underneath a closing door. Modern automatic door openers with auto-stop and auto-reverse mechanisms have greatly reduced such accidents, but mishaps can still occur if the door and door opener are not properly maintained.
6.1 It is time now to unwind the old spring that is not broken. A few warnings are in order. NEVER, NEVER, NEVER touch a set screw without first inserting a properly fitting bar into the winding cone! Also, do not use box or socket wrenches for the set screws. If the cone slips, the wrench could break your hand in 10 spots before unwinding completely. It's my guess that this is the number one cause of trips to the emergency room for inexperienced homeowners fixing or replacing their springs.
Mechanical garage door openers can pull or push a garage door with enough force to injure or kill people and pets if they become trapped. All modern openers are equipped with “force settings” that make the door reverse if it encounters too much resistance while closing or opening. Any garage door opener sold in the United States after 1992 requires safety eyes—sensors that prevent the door from closing if obstructed. Force settings should cause a door to stop or reverse on encountering more than approximately 20 lbs (9.07 kg) of resistance. Safety eyes should be installed a maximum of six inches above the ground. Many garage door injuries, and nearly all garage door related property damage, can be avoided by following these precautions.
If you've installed a replacement door or two around your home, it seems pretty simple -- all it takes is tightening a couple of screws and you're done. Installing t­he largest door in your house, however, is not quite so simple. Garage door in­stallation, whether manual or automatic, can be difficult and dangerous. Manual garage door installation is much easier than automatic garage door installation, but the one you choose generally depends on what kind of door you have.

It’s difficult to say how often the springs will need to be replaced since it’s different for everyone. It depends on how often you use your garage door, how cold and long your winters are, how well you maintain your springs and many other factors. The best rule of the thumb is to check your springs regularly for signs of wear and damage and to replace them when they begin to appear tired.


Your dream car is parked in out of the elements, but it's not secure because the garage door won't lock. Most garage doors have two horizontal bars that move out from the center of the door into slots along the side of the door in the door track, effectively locking the door in place. Over time, these bars can shift slightly out of position so that they are no longer correctly aligned with the locking slots. To realign the bars, unscrew the guide brackets on the edges of the door so that they are loose enough to move, and then reposition them so that they smoothly guide the locking bars into the locking slots. Lubricate the lock mechanism with machine oil and you're done.

The problem is that one of the garage doors "catches" (i.e. stops) while going up at about 2 feet off the ground ~90% of the time. When the button is pressed again, it goes all the way down. This cycle can be repeated ad nauseum, or I can give the door a gentle tug upward just before the "Sticking" point, and this will give the door enough "impetus" to make it all the way up. http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
6.13 Lower the second bar to the top of the garage door as you did the first bar. If your shaft is distorted inside the cone, you may need to tap the bar with a hammer as you unwind the spring. Maintain a firm grip on the bar; keep it firmly inserted completely into the cone; and be prepared at all times for the cone to slip, break, explode or snap loose from the shaft and jolt the bar down.
On one-piece doors with side springs, you open the door to relieve the spring tension, and simply swap out the springs on the opener-arm mechanism; there are no cables or pulleys to deal with, and the springs have internal safety rods. Some doors have tensioners that maintain moderate tension when the door is open all the way, and on these you'll have to loosen the tensioner in order to remove the spring.
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Usually, when a garage door spring breaks the door has already closed or come down. In some instances, however, a spring can snap while the door is closing or in motion, causing the door to fall rapidly. In these situations, the door can become a safety concern for you and your family, so you should keep your distance and call a garage door professional as soon as possible. Garage doors are very heavy and can cause injury if not handled properly. When a garage door problem occurs, call a Sears Garage Door expert to help.
7.2 If the spring bracket is slotted, vise grip the bracket to secure the shaft in the bracket. This will keep the shaft from possibly falling out and causing injury or damaging the garage door or shaft. You can also secure the shaft with a cable tie. Remove the bushing from the cone and leave it on the shaft next to the center spring bracket. Often the bushing gets stuck in the cone and customers will call us about getting a new bushing until they discover it is still in the cone of the spring replaced earlier.
Our team of friendly, knowledgeable technicians have the industries best experience replacing broken springs on garage doors. Replacing a garage door spring can be very dangerous, and we highly encourage you to contact us to handle this repair today! If you have a high cycle application, our garage service team may be able to provide extended use high cycle springs.
There are many steps to replacing torsion springs, but overall it's a simple, straightforward process. If you're inclined to attempt it, find a good online video tutorial (preferably done by a garage door pro) that walks you through the entire process, including how to buy the right size of springs. You can also buy new springs and any related parts online, along with the most important items that you need: the two solid-metal winding rods that you use to wind and unwind the torsion springs.
Installing an overhead garage door requires a few tools and a friend to help. First, the lower door panel needs to be set up in the center of the doorway. The remaining panels and tracks are held in place with hinges, brackets, and screws. Set up an easy-to-install torsion spring system to ensure that your door lifts properly for many years to come.
Most home centers don't carry all the replacement parts you'll need for garage door spring replacement, and most garage door service companies won't sell you springs. So you may have to order the parts online and wait for the shipment to arrive. Garagedoorpartsusa.com and stardoorparts.com are two online sources . First, inspect the condition of your cables and brackets. If you see any frayed strands on the cables or rust on the bottom brackets, replace them now before they fail. Bottom brackets cost about $15 per set. Premium-quality cables (listed as “7x19”) last much longer than economy cables and cost only about $4 more. So it's smart to buy the better cables for about $12 per set.
Squealing, screeching, or grinding noises from your garage door are usually indicative of a lack of lubricant or an accumulation of dirt or debris in the tracks. When removing debris, do not use harsh chemicals to clean the tracks. Once the track is clean, coat it with lubricant designed especially for garage doors, if possible. If you do not have access to this special type of lubricant, you can use WD-40 on the tracks and hardware. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
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If you need to leave the door open until you can make repairs, block the door track on both sides so the door can't move, and unplug the garage door opener (if you have one). If you want to close the door, you can try closing it with the opener, making sure there's nothing in the door's path in case something goes wrong. However, this will put some strain on the opener. Alternatively, you can have a few strong helpers hold the door while you disconnect it from the opener and carefully close the door manually—again, it will be very heavy.

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The problem is that one of the garage doors "catches" (i.e. stops) while going up at about 2 feet off the ground ~90% of the time. When the button is pressed again, it goes all the way down. This cycle can be repeated ad nauseum, or I can give the door a gentle tug upward just before the "Sticking" point, and this will give the door enough "impetus" to make it all the way up.
If your garage door is not opening or has become jammed, you may need to replace the garage door cables. Unless you have the proper tools and know-how, this is a job best left to a professional due to the weight of the garage door and the extreme tension of the springs. The cost of repair will vary depending on your location, the length of the cables you need, and the time it takes the pro to do the replacement.
Thanks for asking for our input. I have enjoyed the 'Future House' episodes that you folks have created. And, I think that the amount of segments-per-season seems just about right - any more and it might begin to take the shows into an area that moves away from their core meaning (i.e. - home repair/rehab/construction, etc). Though, it's easy to understand how new and upcoming technologies fit well into TOH/ATOH's overall picture. Also, Ross Trethewey is a good sement host - very knoledgable and enthusiastic - and, as well, he gives the TOH/ATOH audience some 'younger blood' to continue forward with the show's traditions. My thoughts are to stick with 'Future House' segments.And, thanks for all of the good work you folks do in continuing to present to us each year such wonderful productions as TOH and ATOH, which we get to enjoy and benefit so greatly from!
A garage door spring replacement should cost between $175 and $225 for a single tension spring and between $250 and $300 for two tension springs. Most garage door companies carry a wide enough variety of spring sizes to cover most residential doors. As long as the proper amount of turns are put on the spring, there are more than one correct springs to use for any one door.
Just like on a bike sprocket, your cables can sometimes become disengaged. Oftentimes, when a torsion spring breaks, the garage door cable will snap as a result. Sometimes, the cable will cause damage to a vehicle or wall, and if a person happens to be in the way of the cable it can cause serious harm. If you cables have snapped, you should call a professional to help you. See the video above.
Every homeowner can relate to how life's inconveniences are thrown at you at the worst possible times. The last thing you want to happen is have your car stuck in the garage when you need it most, especially when it's only been a couple months, weeks, or even days after your last garage door repair! That's why Precision leads by example and follows the industry's best practices in order to make the best recommendation to homeowners each time we step foot in a garage. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c
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