Nothing can be more frustrating than trying to open or close your garage door, but have it get stuck halfway. The most common reason this happens is due to a broken torsion spring, a part that is responsible for providing balance. It is a common problem that has many people saying “My garage door has a broken spring or is stuck, what do I do next”? If you are in this same boat, you’ll find the information below very useful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube_gdata&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Opening the door yourself is recommended only during an emergency, as there is an increased risk of it getting stuck again-or worse yet, crashing down on top of you. Moving a wooden door could cause damage to the opener, or the top of a steel door might bend underneath the pressure. If you must open the door long enough to drive underneath it, you may want to prop up either side with some 2×4 pieces of lumber to provide added stability. You could also secure your door to its tracks using a pair of vise grips or a couple of c-clamps.

Measure area labeled headroom (5), which is the distance between the top of the door opening (jamb header) and the ceiling (or floor joist). 10" is required for the standard extension spring or EZ-SET® Extension Spring System while 12" is required for a standard torsion spring and EZ-SET® Torsion Spring System. If you have restricted headroom, special hardware is available. Additional headroom is required for installation of an automatic garage door opener. NOTE: If garage door height extends above the opening, the headroom measurement should be adjusted proportionately.
When your garage door is stuck after a power outage, your whole day can suffer. Summer storms hit, your garage door opener gets caught in the crossfire, and before you know it, your car is being held hostage by your garage. While it stinks to have your garage door stuck open because of safety issues, it may be even more frustrating to have your cars trapped inside. Just like saying your dog was eating your homework as a kid, now you have to explain to your boss how your car is being held hostage. Good luck.
However, if you lose power and use the disconnect switch, you’ll need to reattach it to use your garage door motor to open and close your door again. Open the door all the way and then reattach this hook. Then try opening or closing the door again with your transmitter, and you should be all set. It will be easiest to reattach this hook when your car is not in the garage, as you’ll need to place a step ladder underneath the motor to reach it.
I went on Garage Door Nation website to look at the conversion chart from 1 to 2 torsion springs. For my 1 spring, size 2"/0.250ID/30.5" length, they recommended 2 of 2"/0.207ID/24" length. I got this kit from Amazon for $64 with $11 overnight shipping even though I could get free shipping through Prime over the weekend, but I couldn't wait for 3 more painful days. Installed it followed YouTube video. Worked better than my old one, a lot quieter. Check the video if you want to install one yourself. Professional installation costs hundreds of $$$: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
Electric Garage Door Openers – Service and repair of the electric garage door opener itself, including the lift mechanism that pulls the door up and guides it down. This is typically not part of the garage door itself and is serviced and repaired on its own interval. Typical service includes inspection, repair, adjustment, and lubrication if needed. Also, we typically inspect the mounting of the unit as well as its attachment to the door itself.
While it would be wonderful if door springs lasted forever, the reality is that the simple act of opening and shutting the door multiple times every day isn’t easy. It’s hard on the springs, even though they’re built to do it. Most springs will last for a while, but they won’t last forever. The regular wear and tear of endlessly opening and shutting the door breaks them down and eventually, they’ll need to be replaced.

Garage Door Repair Average Cost Centennial Co 80015


Your dream car is parked in out of the elements, but it's not secure because the garage door won't lock. Most garage doors have two horizontal bars that move out from the center of the door into slots along the side of the door in the door track, effectively locking the door in place. Over time, these bars can shift slightly out of position so that they are no longer correctly aligned with the locking slots. To realign the bars, unscrew the guide brackets on the edges of the door so that they are loose enough to move, and then reposition them so that they smoothly guide the locking bars into the locking slots. Lubricate the lock mechanism with machine oil and you're done.


If the door won’t move at all because of an alignment issue, then this problem isn’t one that you should try to tackle yourself. A garage door professional will have the necessary equipment needed to safely realign and repair your garage door. Additionally, if the track misalignment is beyond repair, a professional can install a new garage door track for you. http://youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
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