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This technician was very competent and performed the services in an outstanding manner. He also suggested additional items needing work on our garage door opener so that it performs much better. It also appears I ordered the wrong door openers, but he was able to input the correct code so that we can use them. We were very satisfied with all of his services.
When a torsion spring is wound up, it grows 2” in length. This is because the spring starts to compress and the metal has to go somewhere. After the spring is wound, the winding cone is clamped down on the torsion shaft so it can turn the drums to wind the cables as the door goes up. Since the end of the spring is “set” on the shaft, a two-inch gap is left when the spring break's. This is the most definite way of determining you have a broken garage door spring.
Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life. http://y2u.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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