On one-piece doors with side springs, you open the door to relieve the spring tension, and simply swap out the springs on the opener-arm mechanism; there are no cables or pulleys to deal with, and the springs have internal safety rods. Some doors have tensioners that maintain moderate tension when the door is open all the way, and on these you'll have to loosen the tensioner in order to remove the spring.
Roberto was very courteous and explained the details of what he was doing. He also pointed out a repair I might consider having done (replacement of the bottom panel of my door) and asked the office to follow up with me on this. Someone did follow up with me and since replacement of the bottom panel is not an option and I would have to replace the door, I decided that I can wait.

Anytime Garage Door Repair Centennial Co 80015


If you have a garage door opener and you suspect a spring has broken, do not disconnect the opener from the door (by pulling the red emergency release handle) while the door is open. If you do, the door can come crashing down under its nearly full weight, with nothing to stop it. This is an extremely dangerous situation. It is never safe to leave the door open when a spring has broken because someone might try to close the door without realizing how heavy it is. Or, they might pull the emergency release handle on the opener.
Thanks for asking for our input. I have enjoyed the 'Future House' episodes that you folks have created. And, I think that the amount of segments-per-season seems just about right - any more and it might begin to take the shows into an area that moves away from their core meaning (i.e. - home repair/rehab/construction, etc). Though, it's easy to understand how new and upcoming technologies fit well into TOH/ATOH's overall picture. Also, Ross Trethewey is a good sement host - very knoledgable and enthusiastic - and, as well, he gives the TOH/ATOH audience some 'younger blood' to continue forward with the show's traditions. My thoughts are to stick with 'Future House' segments.And, thanks for all of the good work you folks do in continuing to present to us each year such wonderful productions as TOH and ATOH, which we get to enjoy and benefit so greatly from!

An extension spring counterbalance system consists of a pair of stretched springs running parallel to the horizontal tracks. The springs lift the door through a system of pulleys and counterbalance cables running from the bottom corner brackets through the pulleys. When the door is raised, the springs contract, thus lifting the door as the tension is released. Typically these springs are made of 11 gauge galvanized steel, and the lengths of these springs are based on the height of the garage door in question. Their lifting weight capacity can best be identified by the color that is painted on the ends of the springs. https://m.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
There are two types of garage door springs: torsion and extension. Torsion springs are horizontal and located near the top of the garage door. Check for a gap between these springs indicating a break. Springs on the sides of the garage door are extension springs. Inspect them to see if one or both of them have broken. If you have a broken spring, call a garage door technician to fix it for you as soon as possible. Never operate a garage door with a broken spring; it could severely damage the door and the operating system. Never attempt to replace a broken spring on your own, either. Replacing broken garage door springs is very dangerous for anyone other than a certified, professional repair technician.
To realign the track, first loosen the screws that hold the track to the frame. Then, gently tap the track with a rubber mallet to move it back into the proper position. Use a level to ensure it’s perfectly straight. Once you have the alignment correct, tighten the screws securely to ensure the track won’t move and cause more issues when opening your garage door. You’ll need to repeat this same process on the other tracks as well, as these may also be out of alignment.
Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life. http://y2u.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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