10.2 Tape your winding bars if you have not done so already, not only to assure that you are inserting the bars completely into the cones as you wind the torsion springs, but more importantly to assure that the bar does not slip out of the cone when you stretch the springs at the end. This has happened to me several times. Professionals always stretch torsion springs after winding them because the shaft floats horizontally between the flexible end bearing plates as the door operates. Although this may be as little as 1/4", the binding of the coils as the garage door closes oftentimes keeps the door from closing completely, especially when the torsion springs and bearings are dry.
Once the springs break, quite a bit of tension is put on the door cables, and they will often break next. When these cables break, they will snap and forcibly fly out like a broken rubber band. Think about how much it hurts to be snapped by a broken rubber band, and then multiply it by a hundred to account for the size and weight of the garage door cables.

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10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode.
We couldn't have been happier with the technician. He was prompt, efficient, didn't complain about moving items to do the installation, cleaned up after himself, was polite and thorough. He seemed very sure of exactly what to do next. As a favor, he took a couple of minutes to remove a light globe to replace a bulb since he had the ladder in the garage because we can't get to it. We were very impressed with him. We would definitely request him again.
If you happen to be home when these break, you’ll hear a loud bang from inside your garage. This bang can be so loud that some people might think a firecracker went off inside their garage. That’s because garage doors can be very heavy and despite what most people think, it’s not the garage door opener that does the heavy lifting, but rather the heavy-duty springs of the door.
The winding and unwinding is done at a metal fitting, called a winding cone, attached to the outside end of the spring. You stick a winding bar into one of the four holes in the cone and use the bar as a lever to turn the cone. Once you've completed a quarter turn, insert the other bar into a different hole in the cone and let the bar lever against the closed garage door to hold the spring tension. This allows you to move the original bar to repeat the process, alternating the bars with each quarter-turn. It takes about 30 quarter-turns to fully tension a standard torsion spring.
Guest 9232954 -- check out the other answers for this question, and the links below the answers for even more - seems from $125-400 range from different contributors (should be replaced in pairs for balanced lifting unless one spring is quite new), about $200-250 or 300 seems a common charge. The springs themselves generally run about $20-50 each depending on lead they have to carry.

2.4 The same is true of Older Overhead, BarCol and Raynor torsion springs that have winding cones with inconsistent hole sizes. If you insert a 1/2" X 18" bar in some of these holes you can move the opposite end of the bar over four inches. Bars in newer cones move less than 1 1/2". I've had many of the older cones spin loose from my bars, the last one generating an $1800 emergency room bill. If your cones are like any of these, or if they have more than 2" of play, leave the job of installing torsion springs to a professional garage door mechanic.
In order to prevent injury, garage doors automatically reverse if they come into contact with an obstacle. When the door closes halfway but then reverses for no apparent reason, this may be a sign that there is something preventing it from closing, something that you can't see. Check the tracks for stuff like dirt, rocks, bits of trash, or other debris. Give the tracks a wipe-down to dislodge anything that might be getting in the way.
Since garage doors come in all weights and sizes, the right springs need to be installed in order to properly balance the door. If a technician puts the wrong spring on your door, not only will this damage your garage door system, but it will cause the garage door opener to do more work than it was built to do. This is why Precision technicians only install the right springs for the door's weight and check their work by performing a balance test.

Eric Jonas has been writing in small-business advertising and local community newsletters since 1998. Prior to his writing career, he became a licensed level II gas technician and continues to work in the field, also authoring educational newsletters for others in the business. Jonas is currently a graduate student with a Bachelor of Arts in English and rhetoric from McMaster University.
10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=kp
Install the stiffening strut on top of the top section of steel doors with the section lying flat. Then install the opener bracket that replaces the center bracket between the top two sections. While you’re working on the sections, protect them from scratches by putting carpet scraps on top of your sawhorses. Now, slide the rollers into the roller brackets.

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In the home improvement world there's a common recommendation regarding garage door spring repair: always leave it to the pros. This is sound advice, but it's not as hard-and-fast as most sources claim. The fact is, a handy homeowner who's competent with tools and has a basic understanding of mechanical systems can replace either type of garage door spring. The procedures are pretty simple, but they involve many steps that must be done in the proper order, just like the pros do it. It's also critical that you get the proper size replacement spring. If you think you're up to the task, look at online tutorials by garage door pros to see what's involved. Helpful videos explain how to measure your old springs and order the correct replacement size as well as how to do the job from start to finish.
Our team of friendly, knowledgeable technicians have the industries best experience replacing broken springs on garage doors. Replacing a garage door spring can be very dangerous, and we highly encourage you to contact us to handle this repair today! If you have a high cycle application, our garage service team may be able to provide extended use high cycle springs. http://youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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