If the door opens this way, then there’s probably something wrong with the garage door opener. It’s a good idea to make sure the opener is plugged into its nearby power outlet. Also, make sure the circuit breaker for the garage door opener hasn’t flipped to the “OFF” position. If it has, then there may be an electrical issue that your garage door specialist should check out.
9.4 Slide the end of the shaft into the end bearing plate. Tighten the set screws an additional 1/4 to 1/2 turns beyond the point you finger-tightened them. Add an additional 1/4 turn if you could not find the original set screw indentations in the previous step. Heavier wooden garage doors may require an additional 1/4 turn. Caution: Under-tightening the drums could cause the drum to slip and the door to cock or fall. Over-tightening the set screws could damage the shaft or drum, resulting in the same problems. This is a critical step. http://youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube_gdata&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
An extension spring counterbalance system consists of a pair of stretched springs running parallel to the horizontal tracks. The springs lift the door through a system of pulleys and counterbalance cables running from the bottom corner brackets through the pulleys. When the door is raised, the springs contract, thus lifting the door as the tension is released. Typically these springs are made of 11 gauge galvanized steel, and the lengths of these springs are based on the height of the garage door in question. Their lifting weight capacity can best be identified by the color that is painted on the ends of the springs.

R-value describes the power of the insulation in your door. The higher the r-value, the stronger the insulation. Those doors will have better energy efficiency than doors that have a low r-value. Basic doors have an r-value of 0.0 with no insulation. The first step up gives you 1-3/8” insulation at a 6.5 rating. Next, a 1-3/8” thickness with Intellicore has a 12.9 r-value. The best option on the market is the 18.4 r-value, which has 2” Intellicore insulation. 

An extension spring counterbalance system consists of a pair of stretched springs running parallel to the horizontal tracks. The springs lift the door through a system of pulleys and counterbalance cables running from the bottom corner brackets through the pulleys. When the door is raised, the springs contract, thus lifting the door as the tension is released. Typically these springs are made of 11 gauge galvanized steel, and the lengths of these springs are based on the height of the garage door in question. Their lifting weight capacity can best be identified by the color that is painted on the ends of the springs. https://m.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
The Leading (scam) in the industry is the "LIFETIME WARRANTY". It sounds great when presented and seems fair and maybe even a good idea even though the initial cost seems pretty high (on average 450 - 700 dollars) what is not mentioned is the annual required cost (known as the required or annual door maintenance) to keep the warranty valid which if a standard 15,000 cycle spring/s is used should average Ten years, this annual service is usually 90 - 120 dollars. That would be another "900 - 1200" dollars invested in Ten years, that and the initial cost and you could buy two or more "complete new" doors in that time.
Maybe the battery died or a spring broke, but you can't get into the garage to even see what the problem is. If the garage door is the only way in or out, or if you can't find the key to the door, you'll have to either find a way to break in or call a locksmith. As a preventative measure, it's smart to keep a spare key or install an emergency key release that would allow you to release the emergency disconnect to the operator so you can manually raise the door.

Garage Door Repair Images Centennial Colorado 80015


The most common question we get over the phone is, "Okay, so how much does it cost to replace garage door springs?" To give you an exact price quote, we would need to know the size of the door, weight, and type of garage door springs needed (torsion or extension). Since we carry over 30 different types of springs to account for all the different types of garage doors, we recommend that a professionally trained technician takes the proper measurements himself before giving you an exact price quote.
The tricky parts of the job involve you carrying the tension of the spring. Replacing a spring requires that you first unwind the spring to relieve the tension, then wind it back up and secure it while it's under tension. Winding bars are used for all winding and unwinding actions—don't try to save a few bucks by substituting long screwdrivers or pieces of rebar for the real winding bars. Substitute tools are much more likely to slip, or they may bend or break under the load of the spring. https://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
4. It is also important to note that extension springs sometimes do not break but rather ‘stretch out’. This is easy to spot as the space between coils when the door is closed is normally consistent. When the spring fails without breaking the space between the coils will become very inconsistent. This condition is quite visible and if it exists the springs should be replaced (Know when to call quits with your garage door). 
If your photo eyes are clean and the door still isn’t closing, the next thing you’ll need to do is check the alignment of the eyes. The eyes should be pointing in exactly the same direction and at the same angle. If they’re off, they won’t register that the other one is there, and it’ll assume something is in its path, causing the door to stay in the open position. When checking the alignment, measure the height of each photo eye from the ground. Use a level to make sure they’re pointing directly across at each other at the same angle. A laser level will make this part a little easier, but if you don’t have one, a regular level will work as well.
If you can hear your garage door motor running for what seems like the full amount of time it normally would take to open or close the door, but the door doesn’t move, chances are the disconnect switch has been enabled. Every garage door opener comes with a disconnect switch in case you lose power. This allows you to open or close the door manually so your car isn’t stuck in the garage until the power comes back on.
9.4 Slide the end of the shaft into the end bearing plate. Tighten the set screws an additional 1/4 to 1/2 turns beyond the point you finger-tightened them. Add an additional 1/4 turn if you could not find the original set screw indentations in the previous step. Heavier wooden garage doors may require an additional 1/4 turn. Caution: Under-tightening the drums could cause the drum to slip and the door to cock or fall. Over-tightening the set screws could damage the shaft or drum, resulting in the same problems. This is a critical step.

There are many steps to replacing torsion springs, but overall it's a simple, straightforward process. If you're inclined to attempt it, find a good online video tutorial (preferably done by a garage door pro) that walks you through the entire process, including how to buy the right size of springs. You can also buy new springs and any related parts online, along with the most important items that you need: the two solid-metal winding rods that you use to wind and unwind the torsion springs.


Torsion springs have three advantages over extension springs: They’re quieter, safer and easier to fine-tune. Torsion springs are quieter because you don’t have a spring knocking against a roller track. They’re safer because when a spring breaks, it usually stays on the bar. Finally, you can fine-tune the tension on a torsion spring so the door is perfectly balanced. Setting the tension on torsion springs has always been very dangerous, but torsion and extension spring systems with easy, do-it-yourself tensioning (Photo 7) are available. If you don’t use one of these DIY-friendly, easy tensioning systems (Clopay EZ-Set Spring and Wayne-Dalton TorqueMaster are two brands), you should hire a professional to release and set the tension on a torsion spring.

The history of the garage door could date back to 450 BC when chariots were stored in gatehouses, but in the U.S. it arose around the start of the 20th century. As early as 1902, American manufacturers—including Cornell Iron Works—published catalogs featuring a "float over door." Evidence of an upward-lifting garage door can be found in a catalog in 1906.[4]
When cleaning the photo eye, you should take care not to scratch or damage the eye since it’s made of glass, similar to that of a camera lens. The photo eye itself is pretty small, only a few centimeters in diameter, but it can get dirty rather easily. To clean it, you’ll need a soft cloth and a mild, streak-free cleaner. Gently wipe away any dirt or residue that has built up on the eye and be careful not to oversaturate as excessive wetness can cause dirt to stick to the eye more quickly.
Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life. http://y2u.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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