10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode.	

A new garage door can add serious curb appeal, not to mention myriad home safety benefits. The cost of a new garage door will vary based on the type of garage door you want and the materials it will be made of. You can purchase a new garage door and have the pros install it for you, but proceed with caution as many installers won’t guarantee their labor if you didn’t purchase the garage door through their company. A new door (without installation) may cost anywhere from $200 to $4,000 or more, depending on size, brand and materials. Here are some examples of average new garage door costs, including installation:  
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My garage door has been acting up. Not wanting to work sometimes. I noticed the blue light flashing on the opener when I push the remote button. Today it will not open. That is the only way in, so I can't go in the garage from inside the house. I can't pull the cord to release the belt drive. How do I open it now? I never did run wires to the manual button into the house. I have to use the opener. Only have one I can find now. It is not working. I need in there now.
The garage door opens and closes many times throughout the year, and something may blow inside. While it is usually something such as loose leaves or small amounts of dirt, the rails that the door travel along can collect this loose debris. Over time, the buildup of debris creates a blockage on the rails. Note where on the rails the door is stuck and clean that area. If children use the garage to leave the house, it's sometimes something as simple as a small, bouncing ball that happens to land in just the right -- or wrong -- spot.
Regardless of the material, you will likely need to perform some regular maintenance tasks. A garage door professional can examine common problem areas to ensure all are working as they should. Additionally, it is necessary to examine the integrity of the door itself, since your garage can be especially vulnerable to security issues if your door is not structurally sound.
Aging garage door springs cause the door to effectively "weigh" more as the steel loses its resiliency. With new springs, a heavy garage door should take no more than about 10 pounds of force to lift into an open position. With springs nearing the end of their lifespan, the force required to lift the door can be considerably more, since a garage door may weigh 200 pounds or more.
Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires. https://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
Although garage door springs can break during any season and at any time, they most commonly break during the winter. This has to do with the temperature change. When the temperature sinks below a specific threshold, the metal will contract. This means it’s extremely possible for your door springs to shrink slightly during the winter months. This is hard on the springs and makes them more likely to break. https://youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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