"We had an unusual repair requirement. We have horizontal sliding steel doors on our 1950's equipment shed. The upper track was damaged by a roofer's forklift while they were loading supplies onto the roof. The track is made out of very heavy steel, not like the track in today's doors. Toby, responded to my request very quickly and came out of his way to inspect the damage. Although it was not something that he had encountered before, he was able to fix the track and the door is operating better than it has in years. Thank you."
What LCD said is more or less right. Those are the ranges you'd typically find you will have to pay, but it's important to remember that the rates vary across the country. One thing I always advice others to do is to get quotes from different contractors. It might not be the biggest job, but you'd be surprised how much difference there typically is in the quoted prices. If you check out the link I put in the resource, it'll take you to a site where you can get quotes from 4 different contractors at once. Under "Select service" you simply pick "Spring Replacement".
If the door won’t move at all because of an alignment issue, then this problem isn’t one that you should try to tackle yourself. A garage door professional will have the necessary equipment needed to safely realign and repair your garage door. Additionally, if the track misalignment is beyond repair, a professional can install a new garage door track for you.
4.4 Take the spring on the left and place it at the left end of the door as pictured here. Notice that the end of the wire points to the right toward the center of the door. This is a right wind torsion spring. It will go above the garage door on the left side of the spring anchor bracket. The winding cone at the other end of this spring is usually painted red.
We arrived at a rental property and tried to open garage door to get our vehicle in so we could unload luggage, etc. Could not open from outside. Went into house and, from inside garage, tried automatic opener but this did not work. So in trying to open the door manually, I reached up and pulled on the red cord attached to a lever. What I could not see, and was not expecting, is that the rope was frayed through almost completely. The rope broke when I applied some weight to it, sending me backwards onto the floor of the garage.

Look at the door rollers on each side of the door. All rollers should be inside the door track. If they are not, you will need to lower the door slowly by hand. If the bottom roller is out on one side, bend the outside edge of the track with a pair of vise grips and push the roller into the track before lowering the door. Bend the track edge back with vise grips.
2.4 The same is true of Older Overhead, BarCol and Raynor torsion springs that have winding cones with inconsistent hole sizes. If you insert a 1/2" X 18" bar in some of these holes you can move the opposite end of the bar over four inches. Bars in newer cones move less than 1 1/2". I've had many of the older cones spin loose from my bars, the last one generating an $1800 emergency room bill. If your cones are like any of these, or if they have more than 2" of play, leave the job of installing torsion springs to a professional garage door mechanic.
Lewis did a great job and not only met my expectations but blew them away. His attention to detail was impressive. He reolaced the springs on my two car garage door and he went out of his way to adjust the tension on my second single car garage door to make it open better. He also recommended replacement of the rollers on my main garage door as they were getting pretty worn out and making some noise. He was very friendly and personable. Was willing to explain what he was doing so we could learn something too. I would recommend Lewis Nagy if you are in his area here in Apollo Beach/Riverview. Thanks again!
Replacing torsion springs is done with the door closed. You start by carefully unloading all of the springs (most standard-size doors have two; any broken spring will already be unloaded), using the winding bars. Then, you unbolt the springs from the central rod bracket, disconnect the cables from the pulleys, and loosen the pulleys and slide them off of the rod. Next, you swap out the springs, reinstall the pulleys and cables, and secure the inside ends of the springs to the central bracket. Finally, you wind up both springs (securing them with two setscrew bolts on the winding cones) and test the door for proper spring tension. Often, springs need an extra quarter-turn or two to get the door balance just right.
10.3 At this point you will wind the spring. Notice that the end of the spring on the winding cone points up when facing you. You will wind both springs up and counter intuitively as if you are trying to unscrew the winding cones from the ends of the springs. Begin by turning the spring up 1/4 turn until it meets resistance. This is your first quarter turn. Count "one." Next, insert the bar and raise it 90 degrees. Insert the second bar. This is "two." As you wind the spring it should grow in length the thickness of one coil for every turn. The cone should cover your mark after the first couple turns. Many garage door tradesmen mark the torsion springs with chalk or paint, but this often generates confusion.
The low rating on the CS is due to the fact that inwas out of town and my wife called because the garage door wouldn't open. We had repairs to the only other exit, and the CS said because it could be opened manually, it was no emergency. She was stuck in the house for over Sixteen hours. No emergency crew came out. Steve, a tech who came out the first time, fixed the door. It is not his fault CS took their sweet time to help a 45 year customer. I commend Steve. I do NOT have anything good to say about CS. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
On one-piece doors with side springs, you open the door to relieve the spring tension, and simply swap out the springs on the opener-arm mechanism; there are no cables or pulleys to deal with, and the springs have internal safety rods. Some doors have tensioners that maintain moderate tension when the door is open all the way, and on these you'll have to loosen the tensioner in order to remove the spring.

The national average for garage door repair cost is between $80 and $110. Some of the factors that affect your garage door repair cost are the type of springs (most often torsion or extension), the size and weight of the door, and the door material. Many garage door pros will charge a service fee to visit your house and determine the problem. Often, the service fee includes a set amount of labor. One example of this is an $80 service fee that includes the first hour of work plus testing and inspecting your garage door and garage door opener, while another pro may charge $150 for the same standard service call.    http://www.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c

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