Poor lubrication is a very common and easy to fix explanation for why you might find your garage door stuck. You should properly lubricate your garage door's track, the opener chain and the springs every few months as part of regular preventative maintenance. Be sure to use Clopay's Garage Door ProLube or sillicone based lubricants. Do not use WD-40.

Garage Door Repair Free Estimate Centennial 80016


Slide the left spring onto the tube and add the cable drum. When your new springs arrive, put the new left spring (the 1 with the end facing up and to the left) on the torsion tube, making sure that the stationary cone on the end of the spring faces the center bracket. After sliding the new spring into place, replace the cable drum and insert the torsion bar into the left bearing bracket.[9]

On one-piece doors with side springs, you open the door to relieve the spring tension, and simply swap out the springs on the opener-arm mechanism; there are no cables or pulleys to deal with, and the springs have internal safety rods. Some doors have tensioners that maintain moderate tension when the door is open all the way, and on these you'll have to loosen the tensioner in order to remove the spring.


Would have appreciated the technician to have explained in better detail about the quality of the first doors we received in our home. The garage doors that were installed recently were an upgrade. I would have selected the better quality of doors with the first installation if it had been explained in better detail and time of decision with the first doors. But, I really love the doors that were recently installed! Explained much better with the new doors. Time was well spent on my decision making and the technician this time was very helpful and knowledgeable. Thank You! Cathy Walsh 

Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life.

When one or both springs break, gravity takes over and you feel the full weight of the door when lifting or lowering it.  It may be possible to pull the door up by hand, although doing so will likely be very difficult. In most cases, two or more people are needed to raise the door high enough for you to drive your car out of the garage. While single garage doors can typically be lifted, double doors are nearly impossible to manipulate due to their excessive weight. http://m.www.youtube.com/embed/Z_eZc-kh40c
Install the center bearing and the right spring, then secure the cones. Slide the torsion bar to the left then add the center bearing. Slide the right spring onto the bar and press the bearing into the stationary cone. Connect both of the stationary cones to the center bracket with the nuts and bolts you removed previously. Remove the locking pliers or clamp from the center bracket.[10]

Another scenario is the garage door goes up very slowly when using the automatic opener. Some garage door openers have DC motors that start off slow when opening and then kick into a higher speed. If you have a broken spring, the opener might stay in the slower speed due to the heavy weight of the garage door. If this happens to you, close the garage door and pull the emergency release rope. Next, try to lift the door. If it is really heavy, then you most likely have a broken garage door spring.
Center and level the first section after you install the brackets. The door must be level even if the floor isn’t, so use shims under the section to level it. The rubber gasket on the bottom section will fill the gaps created by an unlevel floor. To hold the level in place, tape it to the section. To hold the section in place, lightly toenail a 16d nail into the frame and bend it over the section. Add brackets and rollers before setting them in place and stack one section on top of another, toenailing as you go up.
There are many steps to replacing torsion springs, but overall it's a simple, straightforward process. If you're inclined to attempt it, find a good online video tutorial (preferably done by a garage door pro) that walks you through the entire process, including how to buy the right size of springs. You can also buy new springs and any related parts online, along with the most important items that you need: the two solid-metal winding rods that you use to wind and unwind the torsion springs.

Check your garage door rollers to see if they have come off their tracks. If no damage has been done, a tech should be able to easily place them back on. If the track has become bent, however, it must be repaired and possibly (depending on the amount of damage) replaced. Don’t operate your door if it's off track or your track is bent. Your door could become seriously damaged.
6.10 If the garage door comes off the floor when you pull down on the bar, and if the cone still won't loosen, tap the bar next to the cone with a hammer to force the cone beyond the swollen portion of shaft. Maintain a firm grip on the bar; keep it firmly inserted completely into the cone; and be prepared at all times for the cone to slip, break, explode or break free from the shaft and yank the bar down. https://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=share
Eric Jonas has been writing in small-business advertising and local community newsletters since 1998. Prior to his writing career, he became a licensed level II gas technician and continues to work in the field, also authoring educational newsletters for others in the business. Jonas is currently a graduate student with a Bachelor of Arts in English and rhetoric from McMaster University.

One of the best ways to care for your springs is to check them over for wear. You can certainly look at them for damage, but sometimes the damage isn’t something that’s visible. In these cases, try lifting the garage door up from the ground. About halfway up, let go. If the door stays, the springs are still working perfectly. If the door sags or drops at all, this could be a sign that your springs are beginning to weaken and will need replacing soon.
It’s difficult to say how often the springs will need to be replaced since it’s different for everyone. It depends on how often you use your garage door, how cold and long your winters are, how well you maintain your springs and many other factors. The best rule of the thumb is to check your springs regularly for signs of wear and damage and to replace them when they begin to appear tired.
Torsion-spring doors have a drum-like pulley at each end of the metal rod that runs through the springs. Each pulley has a cable attached to the bottom of the door. The springs and pulleys are fixed to the rod so they all rotate together. When the door closes, the rod turns and winds up the springs, creating tension. When the door opens, the springs release the tension and turn the rod in the opposite direction.
With over 300 independently moving parts, your garage door is a deceptively complex piece of equipment. To help prevent malfunctions and break-downs, it is a good idea to occasionally perform a garage door tune-up to keep all of these parts in good working order. A regular tune-up service by a Sears professional can prevent unexpected door problems and prolong the life of your existing equipment. http://m.youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
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