Extension springs are long, lighter-weight springs that run perpendicular to the door and are mounted above the horizontal portions of the door tracks. These springs are tensioned by stretching out, using cables and pulleys, as with the torsion system. Because extension springs are merely suspended between two brackets (they are not mounted to a rod, like torsion springs), they must have a safety cable running through each spring. This helps contain the spring in the event of a breakage. Without the safety cable, a spring breaking under tension is a very serious safety hazard. If you have old springs that don't have safety cables, you should install them even if you aren't replacing the springs.
ryan was way more than early when he showed up. ryan gave me a straight up, not nonsensical "ah..ah..." like someone making up a story to listen to. direct and to the point, like a professional, gave me my options that i could present to the boss. the boss didn;t like the price of the new rollers. but she loves that it doesn't sound like a tank coming home from war. we were completely unprepared for this, so, it's good we got a guy like ryan.
Technician gave me a window of 1-4pm, I called at 330 to see if he was on his way. He told me he would be there at 4pm, reason being was because of the amount of work orders he had that day. He was also by himself, had no helper. I was very satisfied that he was able to repair my garage door. He was very professional considering he showed up on a Friday afternoon on a 100 degree day. Thanks again

SNAP... bang... boom. That is the sound of a garage door torsion spring breaking. It can be a very loud noise that sounds like a firecracker or gunshot. Springs are rated for a certain number of cycles and are the first thing that will break in your garage door assembly. Broken springs are the #1 source of customer calls for garage door repair companies. If you have a broken spring, you should NEVER try to open the door, as it can be very dangerous. This repair should be left to a professional or someone with the right tools and skills. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c


The problem is that one of the garage doors "catches" (i.e. stops) while going up at about 2 feet off the ground ~90% of the time. When the button is pressed again, it goes all the way down. This cycle can be repeated ad nauseum, or I can give the door a gentle tug upward just before the "Sticking" point, and this will give the door enough "impetus" to make it all the way up. http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
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11.1 Many torsion spring replacement accidents occur from springs that are too strong. If the garage door stays on the floor by itself, remove the vise grip from the track. If the door is off the floor and the roller is against the vise grip, close the door with one hand and remove the vise grip with the other. If the springs are too strong, you have to restrain it from flying into the open position.
If your garage door track is out of alignment, it can be a serious issue. The metal track your door runs on needs to be aligned properly in order for your door to move. If you see gaps between the rollers and rail, or bends in the rails themselves, you have a problem. The heavy weight of the door can compound these issues and make them worse until it becomes dangerous to operate your door.
Lower the door and dismantle it by removing the hardware. Lower a double door by recruiting at least two helpers to help with the weight, and place a 2×4 block under the door to prevent smashing a foot or finger when it’s lowered. Remove the sections one at a time by disconnecting the rollers and brackets. If you have windows, tape them to help control flying shards if they break. Then remove the old roller tracks and remaining hardware.
Aging garage door springs cause the door to effectively "weigh" more as the steel loses its resiliency. With new springs, a heavy garage door should take no more than about 10 pounds of force to lift into an open position. With springs nearing the end of their lifespan, the force required to lift the door can be considerably more, since a garage door may weigh 200 pounds or more.
Aging garage door springs cause the door to effectively "weigh" more as the steel loses its resiliency. With new springs, a heavy garage door should take no more than about 10 pounds of force to lift into an open position. With springs nearing the end of their lifespan, the force required to lift the door can be considerably more, since a garage door may weigh 200 pounds or more.
Thread the cables and tighten the drums. Run the lift cable between the roller and the doorjamb. Slip the lift cable stop through the cable slot on the drum. Then, attach locking pliers to the torsion tube to secure it in place. Spin the drum to wind the cable into the grooves, then tighten the set screws. Repeat on the other side, leaving the locking pliers in place.[11]

The national average for garage door repair cost is between $80 and $110. Some of the factors that affect your garage door repair cost are the type of springs (most often torsion or extension), the size and weight of the door, and the door material. Many garage door pros will charge a service fee to visit your house and determine the problem. Often, the service fee includes a set amount of labor. One example of this is an $80 service fee that includes the first hour of work plus testing and inspecting your garage door and garage door opener, while another pro may charge $150 for the same standard service call.    http://www.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
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